The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: May 8, 2015

If you find you are stuck, that the words just will not flow, focus onFocus your attention on writing-and, if necessary, on why you write and on what inspires you to write-and you will write. why you write. Focus on what inspires you to write. Remembering why you started is a great way to get re-inspired and back to putting words down on the page. Nina Amir’s quote, “Focus your attention on writing—and, if necessary, on why you write and on what inspires you to write—and you will write”, is spot on. When the journey gets tough—when you want to give everything up—remember why you started this journey. Maybe the textbook you wanted to teach from did not exist and you knew you could create exactly the version your students needed. Maybe you are on the tenure track and getting published will fulfill your goals and dreams. Whatever it is, let that be your inspiration to move your writing project forward this weekend. Happy writing!

How to find an academic mentor
This is an excellent piece, especially for early career academics, looking to find a mentor. The article not only discusses how to find mentor, but also how to find a mentor that will best meet your needs.

The Data Innovation Conundrum in Higher Education
What does the future of publishing look like for the textbook industry? At BISG’s Higher Ed Conference 2015: Adapt, Learn, Innovate, publishers and start-ups gave their opinions on how the industry will move beyond textbook publishing by developing adaptive learning platforms and other digital content delivery.

Weekly Wisdom: Brought to you by the Letter I
If you are in need of a little motivation/inspiration to get your writing flowing, this is your must read today.

The Trouble With Collaboration
This is a story of a collaboration nightmare—one author does all of the work and waits for the other author’s edits, but they never come. What can you do to hopefully prevent this situation from happening to you? Have you ever experienced a collaboration nightmare?

Five strategies to get your academic writing “unstuck”
Happiness is: writing when the words really flow. But what if the words refuse to flow? What strategies can you use to get “unstuck”? For five useful strategies, read this piece by Raul Pacheco-Vega.

Righting peer review: Are trust and incentives the key?
Many discussions and blog posts regarding peer review have taken place over the past few weeks, this piece included. Topics explored in this particular piece include building trust in the peer review process and offering additional incentives to reviewers.

The One Thing You Must Do to Become a Nonfiction Writer
I really like this piece because it’s a mix of tough love and practical, superb advice. If you’re in need of a little tough love and advice to get your writing flowing, read this piece.

What’s it like to be ‘finished’?
This piece explores what it is like to finally be finished with a PhD and the emotions that follow. This article has been heavily shared on social media and also received 44 comments the first day it was posted. Many scholars also seem to share in these emotions and you too may find that you can relate to the emotions this writer experienced.

How to Show Up Every Day
This is an excellent piece by Shawn Blanc. Blanc offers strategies and advice for how to show up every day and get words down on the page. I love this reminder, “By recognizing and rewarding these small wins each day, it builds up an intrinsic motivation that makes me want to keep doing the important work.”

About Libby Becker

Libby Becker is the Content & Community Manager for the Text and Academic Authors Association (TAA).