What to consider before signing your first textbook contract

The following advice came from a 2014 TAA Conference Roundtable Discussion led by Mike Kennamer and Steven Barkan, entitled, “What I Wish I Had Known Before I Signed My First Textbook Contract”:

“Be prepared that some books don’t make money.” – Steven Barkan

“$3,000 would be a good advance for most first time textbook authors.” – Attorney Zick Rubin

“I received a grant rather than an advance for my text. A grant is better because it isn’t an advance against royalties.” – Mike Kennamer

“You don’t want snapshot quality photos in your textbook. Hire a professional or purchase professional photos.” – Mike Kennamer

Why you should write a private and public purpose statement for your book

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11 Bookish quotes for book lovers

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Ode to TAA

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The three biggest mistakes academic writers make

I grew up in an academic family. When we would gather around the table at holidays, everyone but my bipolar aunt had a Ph.D. My ex-husband once told me he felt I needed to get a Ph.D. to be considered a grown-up by my family. So I know the culture. I am fluent in tenure and promotion, refereed articles and revise-and-resubmit, and the heaven and hell of the sabbatical and adjunct worlds.

As a creative writer and scholar who specializes in teaching mindfulness and writing as ways of dealing with chronic stress and healing from trauma, I bring my expertise in stress-reduction together with my personal experience of what it means to “be an academic.” I want to share with you some insights about the three biggest mistakes I see academic writers making.