McGraw-Hill textbook authors file class action lawsuit against publisher

Class action lawsuit Three authors filed a complaint in U.S. district court asserting that McGraw Hill is in breach of contract for a recent change to royalty calculations for products sold on its Connect digital platform. The complaint, Flynn v. McGraw Hill LLC, 21-cv-00614, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan), was filed on January 22 by Sean Flynn, Associate Professor of Economics, Scripps College; co-author of Economics: Principles, Problems, and Policies. (Now in 22nd edition.), Dean Kardan, Prof Economics and Finance, Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern U; co-author three textbooks: Economics, Microeconomics, and Macroeconomics, and Jonathan Morduch Professor of Public Policy and Economics at Wagner Graduate School of Public Service in NYU, co-author with Dean Kardan of the above three books. [Read more…]

TAA Membership Marketing Manager, Eric Schmieder, is a panelist on upcoming SAGE webinar

Eric Schmieder, Membership Marketing Manager, TAAAs part of Academic Writing Month (AcWriMo), TAA’s Membership Marketing Manager, Eric Schmieder will be participating in a SAGE Publishing webinar on Monday, November 16 titled “What do Publishing Trends Mean for Academic Writers?” moderated by TAA Council of Fellows member, Janet Salmons.

Today’s landscape of academic publishing encompasses much more than the traditional journal article. While academic writers still write books and articles, forms and formats are changing. Electronic journals can include links to media, and increasingly open access journals make it easier to reach academics, professionals, and practitioners outside a specific discipline. Short, monograph length books hone in on a single topic, graphic books illustrate ideas, book sections are accessible as stand-alone PDFs, and textbooks are becoming interactive to be embedded in e-learning platforms. Researchers are finding other ways to share their work electronically, including podcasts and videos, blogs and social media. With more happening via the web versus academic conferences, longstanding silos are cracking as we move beyond geographic and disciplinary constraints. What do these changes mean for academics—when writers must do more than write?

Schmieder will be one of three panelists, alongside Rebecca Bayeck and Sharon Zumbrunn, to address this changing landscape and what those changes mean for academic writers. [Read more…]

TAA Council issues statement on racism

equalityIn a statement issued on June 19, 2020 – Juneteenth – the Textbook & Academic Authors Association (TAA) Council has resolved to lead its members in establishing short term and long-term goals that affect positive change toward social equality in textbook and academic authoring as we move forward. [Read more…]

Attention faculty: Writing opportunity for your students from the New York Times

New York Times editor Susan Fowler is looking for op-eds from college students about “their experiences during the pandemic and what they think about schools reopening”. Students interested in this opportunity should DM Fowler on Twitter: @susanthesquark Learn more about submitting an op-ed essay to the Times here.

Seeking contributors for forthcoming TAA book, ‘Guide to Making Time to Write​’

Guide to Making Time to WriteHave you developed a successful time management or productivity strategy? Do you use any software or tools that have been particularly helpful in managing your time or boosting your productivity–or have you created one yourself?

Share your time management or productivity tips or strategies for possible inclusion in TAA’s forthcoming book, ​”​Guide to Making Time to Write: 100+ Time & Project Management Tips for Textbook and Academic Authors​”.​

All contributors will receive a complimentary ebook version upon publication!

Submit your contributions by July 1

eBook Download: 5 Distinguishing Features of Academic Writing

5 Distinguishing Features of Academic Writing ebook coverDuring Academic Writing Month 2019, TAA hosted a series of #AcWriChat TweetChat events focused on the distinguishing features of academic writing. Throughout the series we explored five academic writing features: Precision, Complexity, Formality, Objectivity, and Accuracy.

This eBook brings together the discussions and resources from those events.

Download. View TAA’s entire library of ebooks.

2020 TAA Council election results announced

TAA members Dave Dillion and Rick Mullins have been elected to the TAA Council, the association’s governing board. This will be Dillon’s second term. They will serve three-year terms beginning July 1, 2020.

Dave DillonDillon is counseling faculty and a professor at Grossmont College. He curated, co-authored and edited three College Success textbooks including Blueprint for Success in College and Career (Rebus Community, 2018), which won a Textbook Excellence Award from TAA and the Open Textbook award from Open Education Global. [Read more…]

Distinguishing features of academic writing #5: Accuracy

accuracyIn our final discussion of this series on distinguishing features of academic writing, we focused on accuracy. Specifically, we considered what it means to be accurate, how understanding and vocabulary affects accuracy, how to check for accuracy in sources we use, how accuracy affects the structure, style, and grammar of a manuscript, and why accuracy is important in academic writing. Below is a summary of the discussion. [Read more…]

TAA Webinar: A Crash Course in Creative Commons Licensing

Did you know that over 1 billion works — including scholarly articles and a growing number of academic textbooks — have been licensed with a Creative Commons (CC) license? Though widely adopted, these continually-updated, legally-enforceable tools remain a mystery to academic writers. Many authors are unaware of the permissions afforded to them through the CC licenses, and many are unaware of permissions afforded to users when a specific CC license is applied to their work by an open-access publisher.

Join us and presenters Danielle S. Apfelbaum, Senior Assistant Librarian at Farmingdale State College, and Derek Stadler, Assistant Professor at LaGuardia Community College, Monday, April 6 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET for the TAA Webinar, “A Crash Course in Creative Commons Licensing”, to understand how copyright and the CC licenses work in concert to protect author rights while communicating additional permissions to users, identify and interpret each of the six CC licenses, determine how CC-licensed materials may or may not be used without permission in traditional and open publications, and select a license should attendees wish to openly license their work.

This webinar is open to members and non-members in our effort to support writers during this difficult time. Register here

Distinguishing features of academic writing #4: Objectivity

fresh work area with a blank screen on the laptopA good researcher is objectively seeking answers to their research questions and reporting those findings objectively to the community at large. But what does it mean to write objectively? How do we maintain objectivity where possible? Finally, how do we make efforts to identify and avoid bias in our academic writing?

In our fourth discussion of the distinguishing features of academic writing, we discussed all of these questions. A summary of the discussion and related resources is below. [Read more…]