The most useful textbook & academic posts of the week: June 8, 2018

“It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.” ~Oscar WildeOscar Wilde once said, “It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.” This week’s collection of articles has many things to read that may help you today or be foundation for who you will be in the future.

The list begins with helpful advice on bio-notes, collaboration, managing research notes, reviving “dead” writing projects, and working with data visualization and research. We then explore some insight into grant applications and journal paper review processes before closing with discussions of open access initiatives in textbook and academic authoring environments and the announcement of Eva O. L. Lantsoght’s new book, The A-Z of the PhD Trajectory.

Whatever you read from this list or otherwise this week, choose items that will continue to shape your career as an author both now and when you can’t help it. [Read more…]

7 Strategies for writing successful grants

grant writing folderThroughout my journey as a grant writer, reviewer, and mentor to aspiring grant writers, I have had multiple opportunities to read grant proposals that received funding—and many more that did not. One question I often get from novice grant writers is: “How do I get my proposal funded?” To address this question, it is helpful to examine strategies that successful grant writers have in common. Here, I highlight seven basic strategies that I consider “musts” when it comes to preparing grant proposals. [Read more…]

Academic writing tips from an author of 300+ articles and books

Writing for PublicationKen HensonVeteran author Kenneth Henson has spent a career learning how to write grants, articles and books. He has published more than 300 national and international publications, including 56 books. He presents workshops on grant writing and writing for publication at campuses nationwide.

The following are two tips from Henson’s new academic and grant writing tips page on Facebook & LinkedIn:
[Read more…]

Hughes receives TAA Publication Grant

Sabrina HughesSabrina Hughes, a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, Florida, was awarded a TAA Publication Grant to cover expenses associated with the publishing of her article, “Imag(in)ing Paris for Posterity,” to be published in Future Anterior, the historic preservation journal of Columbia University, published by the University of Minnesota Press.

“Receiving the TAA grant is such an honor,” said Hughes. “Publishing art history articles can be very costly because of the necessity of image reproductions to the article. I’m a photography historian, which adds another level of complexity and expense since there are often additional licensing fees that come along with publishing photographs. This grant is an invaluable gift to emerging scholars who, like myself, are publishing independent of institutional financial backing.” [Read more…]

New TAA Publication Grants awarded

Dr. Amy Rebecca Gansell

Dr. Gansell

Dr. Amy Rebecca Gansell of St. John’s University, Drs. Jan-Willem van de Meent and Chris H. Wiggins, and doctoral candidate Sakellarios Zairis of Columbia University were recently awarded a $1,000 TAA Publication Grant to help cover the cost of photos for their forthcoming article, “Stylistic Clusters and the Syrian/South Syrian Tradition of First-Millennium BCE Levantine Ivory Carving: a Machine Learning Approach”. The article, which was published online in November 2013 in the Journal of Archaeological Science, will be published in print in the spring of 2014.

“I am very grateful for TAA’s grant, which subvents the costs of publishing color illustrations of scientific diagrams and five previously unpublished ancient sculptures,” said Gansell. [Read more…]

Prolific grant writer shares his advice on landing grants

grant writing folderThe key element in grant writing is attitude, said Kenneth Henson, distinguished professor at the Citadel’s School of Education, and author of a new book by Allyn & Bacon, Grant Writing in Higher Education: A Step-by-Step Guide. “You have to believe that you can take it as far as you want to as long as you’re willing to work hard,” said Henson, during his TAA Convention presentation, “Grant Writing in Higher Education,” in Las Vegas, June 22. “If you don’t have a belief in your ability to succeed, it’s not going to happen.” [Read more…]

Grant-writing: A game you can win

grant writing folderGrant writing is fun! It’s a way to get a lot of money, and more. I love it because it’s a game I know I can win. You can, too, if you use my game plan.

A former University of Florida classmate, whom I believe to be one of the best football coaches in the country today, recently gave us the first key to winning. When losing a game, he said, “I guess we just didn’t want it badly enough.” Like sports, grant-writing is competitive. Winning requires a plan, and more; it requires passion. Here’s my plan. [Read more…]

3 Tips for writing a successful grant application

Q: “I need to write my first grant application. What are the elements I need to include to ensure that my project is funded?”

A: Elaine M. Hull, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Florida State University, and the recipient of 20 years of NIH funding, shares three basics tips:

  1. The proposed research should answer an important question, have justification based on previous work and/or pilot data, and have a reasonable end point. Emphasize hypothesis testing, as opposed to a ‘fishing expedition.’ State how the outcome of the project will relate back to the ‘Big Issues’.
  2. Present the idea clearly. Organize paragraphs and write in short, clear sentences. Anticipate potential questions and criticisms. A diagram is worth more than the space it takes up.
  3. Don’t be discouraged by rejection. It’s unusual to get funding from the NSF or NIH on the first try. Seek advice from a person in the grant agency or another expert in the field.

 

Tips to ensure your project is funded

Tips of the Trade ImageQ: “I need to write my first grant application. What are the elements I need to include to ensure that my project is funded?”

A: Elaine M. Hull, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Florida State University, and the recipient of 20 years of NIH funding, shares these basics tips for writing a proposal:

“1) The proposed research should answer an important question, have justification based on previous work and/or pilot data, and have a reasonable end point. Emphasize hypothesis testing, as opposed to a ‘fishing expedition.’ State how the outcome of the project will relate back to the ‘Big Issues’; 2) Present the idea clearly. Organize paragraphs and write in short, clear sentences. Anticipate potential questions and criticisms. A diagram is worth more than the space it takes up; 3) Don’t be discouraged by rejection. It’s unusual to get funding from the NSF or NIH on the first try. Seek advice from a person in the grant agency or another expert in the field.”

A: Kären Hess, the author or co-author of more than 30 trade books and college-level textbooks on a variety of topics including financial planning, dental marketing, art, literature, engineering, hospice care, reading, management and report writing:

“Key is a worthwhile idea about which the proposal writer is passionate, carefully formulated with a good chance of success. If there is an RFP, follow the guidelines exactly. Research the foundation and match the proposal to their stated mission statement.

Include a cover letter, a cover page, table of contents, statement of needs (problem statement), proposed solution or program strategy, goals and objectives, how and by whom implemented, timeline, pricing, how evaluated, qualifications of those involved (some grantors request resumes of all key personnel) and references if applicable.

As with book proposals, presentation is critical — – the axiom you never get a second chance to make a first impression applies. Use a good printer and quality paper with a professionally appearing binder. Never submit a handwritten proposal.”