Textbook and academic discussions – keep them going

Roundtable Sessions 2018If you were at the 31st Annual Textbook & Academic Authoring Conference in Santa Fe, NM last weekend, you know the excitement and passion this group of authors shared throughout each session and networking opportunity. For the nearly 100 participants in the roundtable discussions held Saturday afternoon, there was much to talk about and some incredible ideas shared in the groups. Many participants expressed an interest in continuing these conversations beyond the conference. To this end, we have used the roundtable discussion topics to start eight threads in our LinkedIn group for just that reason.

If you were in attendance, we’d love for you to get the conversation started by sharing notes from the session with our LinkedIn group. If you weren’t able to attend (or were participating in another roundtable at the time), please share your insight, ideas, and questions in any or all of the discussions linked below. The roundtables just got bigger! Welcome to the table! [Read more…]

Successfully building collaborative authoring relationships

collaborationDeveloping a collaborative relationship with other authors can be both rewarding and challenging. For many, writing is an individual effort, so how do you determine when it is beneficial to partner with one or more other authors on a manuscript? To learn more about the advantages of author collaboration, we sought the insight of several TAA members who have been successful in developing manuscripts with co-authors.

Q: What are some advantages of finding a collaborator?

A: Drew Curtis, co-author of Abnormal Psychology: Myths of ‘Crazy’“Collaboration offers numerous benefits, which is why most academic disciplines encourage it. [Read more…]

Who can I get to write that chapter?

Woman thinkingYou are all set. The approach to your topic is inspired. A firm table of contents has been finalized. Your book proposal is great. And you now have a contract with a respected publisher!

But, who is going to do all this writing? You have probably carved out specific chapters that you will write. You may have spoken with some colleagues that like the project and said they would be glad to help out. You have a list of likely people to write other key chapters, but you will need more contributors. How do you go about identifying and asking people to contribute to your book? [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: November 20, 2015

November is rapidly coming to a close. How are you The only real advice you can give anyone is to keep writing. David Sedarisprogressing with your #AcWriMo goals? Are you finding work-life balance? Are you in a writing slump? In this week’s post you’ll find advice for tackling those challenges and more. However, I’d like for you to also consider this: does “the answer” have to be a complicated, over-the-top formula? Or, could it be really quite simple? As simple as David Sedaris suggests, “The only real advice you can give anyone is to keep writing.” I don’t know about you, but I like simple. So for now my mantra is: When in doubt, write it out.

Happy writing! [Read more…]

Collaboration: How to determine author order [Infographic]

Collaborating on a writing project can offer many advantages, but how do you determine in which order each author’s name should appear? Check out the infographic below to help you decide!
[Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: July 3, 2015

Writing is like exploring a new place you’ve never been to before. If it scares you, it might be a good thing to try.As with exploring, writing can be exciting and fast paced, but it can also be scary and difficult, or it can cause you to pause and reflect. Some explorations are done alone, while others are done with a companion or a group, just as writing can be done in solidarity or in a group setting. By exploring or writing with others, they are there to push you, to focus you, and to help you along the way. You might tread carefully along the path unsure of where it is taking you or what might be around the next corner. Just as often, writing can leave you feeling unsure and where to go next on the page. Although [Read more…]

What to consider before co-authoring

Writing Accountability PartnerCo-authorship can be an extremely valuable experience for academic authors, but it can also pose unique challenges. When selecting a co-author it is important to consider several factors—including his or her area of expertise, writing ability and personality—in order to ensure that the co-author experience is a positive and successful one. It is also important to assess a potential co-author’s level of commitment to ensure that all parties are truly vested in the project. [Read more…]