Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: April 17, 2020

“The art of writing is the art of discovering what you believe.” ~Gustave FlaubertGustave Flaubert once said, “The art of writing is the art of discovering what you believe.” In textbook and academic writing, we often find this to be true as we search for the answers to research questions and work to clearly express ideas and knowledge to our readers. But, like art, writing and the writing process is unique for each author.

Our collection of articles begins with an approach that focuses on writing for yourself first and your audience second, methods to communicate research findings to the world, and the impact of COVID-19 on student research projects. We also consider the differences between part time and full time researchers and students and how the current state of the world has forced even full time faculty and researchers into a part time routine. Finally, we explore some industry concepts including the bundling of academic journal subscriptions, potential budget cuts to academic libraries, and the stories behind some scholarly publishing brand names.

Whether you’re working on putting a name to your work or carefully crafting each word that is placed on the page as you finish your most recent written masterpiece, let the art of your writing help you discover your beliefs. Happy writing! [Read more…]

Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: April 10, 2020

“Even the greatest was once a beginner. Don’t be afraid to take that first step.” ~ Muhammad AliWhether you just started an academic writing career or you have been publishing journal articles and textbooks for years, the sudden changes in recent weeks can have us all feeling like beginners.

This week’s collection of articles discusses topics of researching in a digital world, changes in the academic library, considerations related to PhD pursuits during COVID-19, and do’s and don’ts for using visuals during virtual meetings. We close the collection with articles about getting by and getting on and publishing models in an open age.

Muhammad Ali once said, “Even the greatest was once a beginner. Don’t be afraid to take that first step.” Whether your first step or your next first step – Happy writing! [Read more…]

How to get your textbook noticed by librarians and book buyers

Here’s what every book promoter and author should know: Libraries (and your local bookstore) provide a significant market for independent titles—especially self-published or those from small presses, said Kimber Bilby, ForeWord Reviews marketing director.

The American Library Association reports that public, school, college and university libraries spent over $1.9 billion on book purchases in 2007. Before you mail out copies of your book, said Bilby, keep the following in mind:

  1. List all wholesalers and distributors for your title, and place ordering information prominently on your sales sheet, including ISBN / Genre / Publisher / Publishing Date / Binding / Price / Page Count.
  2. Promote your book with a brief description (no more than three sentences). Focus on why your book would be popular. Does is touch on a hot topic, focus on health, feature zombies, or is it a patron-pleasing mystery?
  3. List your credentials.
  4. Include copies of professional book reviews. With mention of these, many libraries can then show a need to buy for their collection.
  5. Address your book and sales sheet to the library’s acquisition buyer or director.