Successfully building collaborative authoring relationships

collaborationDeveloping a collaborative relationship with other authors can be both rewarding and challenging. For many, writing is an individual effort, so how do you determine when it is beneficial to partner with one or more other authors on a manuscript? To learn more about the advantages of author collaboration, we sought the insight of several TAA members who have been successful in developing manuscripts with co-authors.

Q: What are some advantages of finding a collaborator?

A: Drew Curtis, co-author of Abnormal Psychology: Myths of ‘Crazy’“Collaboration offers numerous benefits, which is why most academic disciplines encourage it. [Read more…]

Three new writing templates added to TAA’s Templates & Samples Resource Library

Templates and SamplesThree new templates have been added to TAA’s Templates & Samples Resource Library – a grant requirements matrix template and writing collaboration planning and progress templates.

The grant requirements matrix template was contributed by Erin Comeaux, a grants coordinator with Pasadena ISD, and Jennifer Travis, a professor of mathematics at Lone Star College-North Harris, who use it to keep track of each grant requirement, as well as the solicition/RFP page number or URL, paragraph number or URL, and who is responsible for drafting each requirement, to make sure all the grant’s instructions are being followed. [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: February 12, 2016

Roses are redAcademicValentines_TAA blog
Violets are blue
‘Revise and Resubmit’
Roses are a prickly bush or shrub
Violets are a herbaceous plant
Watch for more #AcademicValentines on Twitter throughout the weekend—you don’t even need a Twitter account to see all of the hilarious tweets!

Happy writing! [Read more…]

Select 2015 TAA Conference presentations now available on demand

On Demand PresentationsSelect presentations from TAA’s 2015 TAA Conference in San Antonio, TX are now available on demand. Access to these presentations is free for all TAA members. Learn how to jump-start your academic writing, reach your productivity peak, publish a disciplinarily education paper, make your textbook more memorable to your audience, design and author better assessment exercises, be an effective collaborator, write a non-fiction book proposal, and more! Visit TAA’s library of Presentations on Demand [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: July 10, 2015

I love this quote because it reminds me of Anyone who says writing is easy isn't doing it right.a fitness quote I also love (and as you may know, I am a fitness fanatic), “It never gets easier, you just get stronger.” I think this is also true for writing. It never really gets easier, but you do become a stronger, more confident writer the more you write. Don’t you agree?

Happy writing! [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: April 24, 2015

Every week I bring you what I feel are the most useful blog faulkner_get it down.take chancesposts from around the web. So, I hope it goes without saying that our blog also has some AMAZING content that should already be on your list to read! For example, a couple of really great posts that I hope you didn’t miss were 6 Tips for finding writing time and 6 Useful software tools for academic writers. We also have GREAT posts by guest bloggers like Cassie Premo Steele and Tanya Golash-Boza (and so many others!). My point is, our blog Abstract has great content every week. That’s why you should, if you haven’t already, sign-up to receive our weekly eNewsletter. (Simply enter your email in the box on the right and click ‘Subscribe!’). It will save you time because once a week, every week, you’ll receive this eNewsletter that is jam-packed with great articles to help you thrive as an academic or textbook author.

Happy writing! [Read more…]

How to establish author order when collaborating with multiple authors

collaborateWhen multiple authors collaborate to write a journal article, the task of determining authorship order inevitably arises. In some situations, the order may be obvious, but in many cases, it can be difficult to decide, and having a plan in place to establish author order can help the process go more smoothly.

Collaborating authors are usually listed in order of the relative size of each author’s contribution to the article, but sometimes it can be a challenge to gauge the size or importance of each author’s contributions. One way of facing this challenge is to take a mathematical approach to determining each author’s contribution, and thus author order. For example, Christine Beveridge and Suzanne Morris, the authors of the July 25, 2007 Nature article entitled “Order of merit,” recommend using a multi-criterion decision making approach, which involves the following steps: [Read more…]

A veteran textbook author’s insights on contracts, coauthoring & more

Veteran textbook author Frederic (“Ric”) Martini, lead author of ten undergraduate texts on anatomy and physiology or anatomy, shares his insights on publishing contracts, author collaboration, and more. [Read more…]

How to determine author order when collaborating with multiple authors

Determining author orderWhen multiple authors collaborate to write a journal article, the task of determining authorship order inevitably arises. In some situations, the order may be obvious, but in many cases, it can be difficult to decide, and having a plan in place to establish author order can help the process go more smoothly.

Collaborating authors are usually listed in order of the relative size of each author’s contribution to the article, but sometimes it can be a challenge to gauge the size or importance of each author’s contributions. One way of facing this challenge is to take a mathematical approach to determining each author’s [Read more…]

A veteran textbook author’s insights on contracts, author collaboration & more: An interview with Ric Martini

Ric Martini

Ric Martini

Ric Martini Anatomy and Physiology textbooks

Frederic (“Ric”) Martini received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in comparative and functional anatomy for work on the pathophysiology of stress. He is the lead author of ten undergraduate texts on anatomy and physiology or anatomy. Martini is currently affiliated with the University of Hawaii at Manoa and has a long-standing bond with the Shoals Marine Laboratory, a joint venture between Cornell University and the University of New Hampshire.

A veteran textbook author, here Martini shares his insights on publishing contracts, author collaboration, and more. [Read more…]