Why you should write a private and public purpose statement for your book

purposeBy taking some time to really think through the purpose and scope of your book project and why you are really doing it, you will not only be happier with the process and product, but when you are ready to start writing, you’ll be more successful, says faculty and productivity coach Susan Robison, author of The Peak Performing Professor: A Practical Guide to Productivity and Happiness.

Start by writing a private purpose statement that spells out your reason for writing the book and that will guide you on a day-to-day basis, she says. Your private purpose statement might be something like, “I want to declare my expertise in… [fill in the blank].”

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PODCAST: TAA webinar, ‘How to Write a Book When You Don’t Like to Write’

Susan RobisonMany academic book authors love writing while others want to write but are reluctant about the writing process, the work load, and the sacrifice. Susan Robison, a self-professed reluctant author, addresses those issues and other practical topics such as defining the purpose and scope of the project, managing the tasks and the time during the writing, improving your writing as you go, and when to ask for help, in this recorded webinar now available on the TAA website. [Read more…]

Robison publishes new book on work-life balance

Peak Performing ProfessorTAA member Susan Robison, a former professor of psychology and department chair at the Notre Dame of Maryland University, has published a new book, The Peak Performing Professor (Jossey-Bass, 2013). The book assists faculty in developing essential skills to enhance peak performance and experience more work-life balance.

Manage your writing goals with ‘Pyramid of Power’

Susan Robison

Psychologist and author Susan Robison (right in blue jacket), attracted a full group for her Roundtable Discussion expanding on her earlier session, “Time Management: Why You Don’t Need It, Can’t Do It Anyway — And What To Do Instead.”

To help her clients focus on important tasks instead of wandering from task to task, Susan Robison, a psychologist and faculty development consultant with Professor DeStressor, created the “Pyramid of Power” — a pyramid-shaped goal-setting model.

“I chose the pyramid for the design of my model because that is the most stable structure you can construct,” she said. “It has a wide base and a narrow top, with your goals at the top. The model can work top down and bottom up.” [Read more…]

Don’t manage time, manage goals

Susan Robison

Susan Robison instructing conference attendees on how to manage their workload, not their time, to complete tasks.

While you can’t actually manage time – because it operates independently of you — you can manage your goals, said Susan Robison, a psychologist and faculty development consultant with Professor DeStressor, during her 2009 TAA Conference session, “Time Management: Why You Don’t Need It, Can’t Do It Anyway – And What To Do Instead.”

“One of the things that the research on time management workshops show, is that they don’t work,” she said. “What happens to people emotionally is they come out of the workshops feeling absolutely overwhelmed by a thousand techniques they’re not going to do, and so they’re not going to manage their time any better.” [Read more…]