Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: January 3, 2020

“The best way to predict the future is to create it.” ~Peter DruckerWelcome to 2020! This week I want you to consider what your vision for the new year and new decade is. What does that vision look like for your individual writing goals on textbook and academic projects? What does that look like for the publishing industry at large? How can you plan now to accomplish those goals in the coming days, months, and years?

This week’s collection of articles begins with a look back on 2019, looks at the difference between free and OER when discussing textbooks, offers suggestion on how to select the right planning and project management tools, and considers the abolition of academic prizes. As we begin this new year of textbook and academic writing, I encourage you to remember the words of Peter Drucker, “The best way to predict the future is to create it.” Happy Writing! [Read more…]

Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: October 11, 2019

“I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in.” – Robert Louis StevensonThis week’s collection of articles from around the web includes such topics as the user-centric future of academic research software, crowd-funding research projects, writing the thesis from the middle, evaluative focus groups, citations of friends and reviewers, and roadblocks to better open access models.

We close the collection with a book review of two new guides to academic life and a new approach to keeping up with academic publications – knowledge mapping.

Robert Louis Stevenson once said, “I kept always two books in my pocket, one to read, one to write in.” As you work this week, may you continue to grow through what you read in a way that lets you produce more from what you write. Happy writing! [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic posts of the week: June 29, 2018

"I went for years not finishing anything. Because, of course, when you finish something you can be judged." ~Erica JongThis week’s collection of articles from around the web contains a variety of topics of interest or concern to authors. If you’re considering tools to support your scholarly writing efforts, there are articles related to Revision Assistant, Google Drive, and the latest in search. Ethics-minded? We have articles on using tweets as data, sharing story ownership, and interpretation of results. Thinking about your publishing options? There’s continued discussion on open access models. Just trying to move forward in your scholarly writing? We also found time-saving tips for writing papers and methods for being a “star PhD student”.

Erica Jong once said, “I went for years not finishing anything. Because, of course, when you finish something you can be judged.” This week we encourage you to finish something. Be brave. Be brilliant. And write without fear of judgement. [Read more…]

6 Useful software tools for academic writers

Software ToolsIf you’re like most academics, you have many demands on your time. Wouldn’t it be nice if some of those demands could be made a bit easier?

Here are 6 useful software tools that can help make the writing process faster or help you better organize your notes and literature:

1. Dragon Naturally Speaking. This speech recognition software (available only in paid versions) allows you to dictate documents, search the web, dictate and send emails and more using only your voice.

2. Docear-The Academic Literature Suite. This free open source tool helps you organize, create and discover academic literature. [Read more…]