What you need to know about using third party photos

copyrightToday’s business models for licensing third party photography are sufficiently complex that it’s worth taking a few minutes to review the basics and get familiar with the terminology.

Categories of Use: Editorial vs. Commercial

Professional photographers and stock agencies group their work into three broad categories based not on the nature of the photos but instead on the use to which they will be put: editorial, commercial, and retail. Retail use concerns photography commissioned for personal use, and thus is of little consequence to book publishers . . . except, perhaps, for that studio portrait you supplied for the back cover or “about the author” page of your book, a use for which you may have neglected to get the necessary license. Editorial use concerns photography which will be used in a book, e-book, magazine, online, or in a presentation or video that is journalistic, educational, or expository in nature. Commercial use, conversely, concerns photography that will be used in advertising and promotion to sell or market a product (including a book), person (including an author), company (including a publisher), or service. [Read more…]

Images are an integral part of your book, but how do you find an artist for creating them?

Q: “How do you find an artist for images in a text or trade book? Who pays? At what point is the art done? If the images are an integral part of the book, how does all of this work?”

A: Paul Siegel, Ph. D., Professor of Communication, University of Hartford, TAA President:

“I am not sure if my own experience is relevant to your situation, but here goes… The kind of ‘art’ I tend to use a lot of in my textbook is cartoons. I got tired of paying for permission to reprint cartoons (political cartoons, or funny pages cartoons), knowing I would have to track down the cartoonist or the syndicate for each edition.

So I instead hired a cartooning student at my university’s Art School. Functioning as a kind of theatre director, I worked with her to create the kinds of images and narratives I sought to emphasize or satirize key points in my textbook. [The subject is communication law, so the opportunities for humor are many].” [Read more…]