The most useful textbook & academic posts of the week: November 10, 2017

"The secret to good writing is to use small words for big ideas, not to use big words for small ideas." ~Oliver MarkusThis week, November 6-11, 2017, was not only the first full week of Academic Writing Month (AcWriMo) 2017, but it also marked the sixth annual #UPWeek event in celebration of University Press Week. Throughout the week, there were a lot of great resources being shared throughout the academic community, no doubt inspired by these events. Our collection this week has something for everyone beginning with some humor illustrating the life of a grad student and tips about academic writing; exploring the scholarly process involving university presses, scholars, and reviewers; taking new perspectives on the publishing process, idea development, and resulting impact; increasing accessibility of scholarly resources; and sharing ideas with a broader audience. As stated by Oliver Markus, “The secret to good writing is to use small words for big ideas, not to use big words for small ideas.” Now go, write, and share your big ideas! [Read more…]

6 Tips for marketing your textbook

Textbook StackQ: “I have been writing a textbook but so far have been unable to interest a major publisher. I may publish it with a small publisher without a sales force. That leaves me to market the textbook. Can you share some advice for what I should do in this situation?”

A: Robert Christopherson, professor emeritus of geography at American River College and author of the leading physical geography textbooks in the U.S. and Canada:

“Here are some ideas:

1. Examine similar textbooks in the field you are writing in over the past 10 years. Record publisher names, editors listed on the copyright page, and begin a list of any reviewers listed in the Preface. This process will give you an idea of publishers active in the discipline and some you might want to contact with your proposal. The reviewers master list will add to names you already may know who can act as reviewers for your manuscript. You will have to invest some upfront money in paying reviewers. Sometimes the reviewer list will give you an idea where large course offerings exist in your subject area. You will want to select some of your reviewers from these departments. Make a spreadsheet with these names and schools so its searchable.

[Read more…]