Quandaries in your academic project? Use your inner mentor

you as academic mentorMost of us probably had mentors in graduate school and may still maintain contact with them. But they may not be available every time we need their advice or guidance. I suggest that we all have a mentor that is always available, night and day, every season and semester, for every situation and circumstance.

The IM

This is your Inner Mentor (IM), also called your inner guide, self, voice, spirit, higher power, soul, subconscious, guidance system, intuition, even your heart or gut. It has more power than your department or committee chair, the dean of your school, and even the guy who issues your annual parking sticker. [Read more…]

5/1 TAA Webinar: ‘Demystifying the Literature Review’

Literature reviews are one of the more challenging genres of academic writing. Join us Tuesday, May 1, 3-4 p.m. ET for the TAA Webinar, “Demystifying the Literature Review”, presented by Dr. Daveena Tauber, Founder of ScholarStudio, to talk about strategies for reading, making sense of, and writing about the literature. Whether you’re writing a literature review for a dissertation, an article, or the introduction to your book, you won’t want to miss this rare opportunity to get clarity on this important part of your project. This webinar will help you understand not only what it means to synthesize the literature, but will also give you tools for doing it.  [Read more…]

How to write an effective journal article abstract

Hand extended welcominglyHave you heard the saying “You don’t get a second chance to make a first impression”? For most research articles, the abstract is the first – and possibly the last – impression an author has on a potential reader. If ineffective, the researcher will move on to the next abstract in the search results. If effective, your article will be read further, and potentially cited in the new research.

The ability of your abstract to encourage the researcher to read further determines whether you have an opportunity to make an impact with your article. So how do you ensure a quality first impression? [Read more…]

#AcWriChat TweetChat: Not on Twitter? Watch live here on 3/23 at 11 a.m. ET

acwrimoJoin TAA on Twitter on Friday, March 23 at 11 a.m. ET using the hashtag #AcWriChat for our latest TweetChat focused on thinking about journals and publishing your work.

Not on Twitter? Not sure what a “Tweet Chat” is? Follow us here (you won’t be able to actively participate, but you will be able to follow the chat live).

[Read more…]

4 Key strategies for choosing the right journal

academic journal stackDuring the 2017 TAA Conference session, “Weeding and Harvesting the Most Appropriate Journal for Your Work: Successful Strategies from Novice and Experienced Academic Writers,” Laura Jacobi, an assistant professor in the Department of Communication Studies at Minnesota State University, Mankato, shared four key strategies she employs when seeking the right journal to publish her work.

1) Create a System of Organization

To stay organized, Jacobi uses binders labeled for each major project or category that contain information about each journal she plans to submit to. [Read more…]

The not-always-obvious ‘infrastructure’ of journal articles: Abstracts and textual linkages

Journal article infrastructureNot all who wander are lost. In fact, some who wander are not lost but just exploring the terrain. Yet, when I read a journal article, I do not want to wander and wonder where the work is headed. Partly because of my busy schedule and largely because I am seeking ideas, information and even inspiration, I want to know right away what the scholarly work is about. Scholars can guide readers along a smooth reading road by paying attention to the not-so-obvious infrastructure of typical journal articles and writing their submissions with this structure in mind. [Read more…]

Learn how to respond to reviewer feedback
Join us 10/27 for TAA webinar on manuscript review in the humanities

Katie Van HeestAfter peer review but before publication, even the best manuscripts typically require revision. When you are faced with readers’ reports, it’s key to understand clearly the feedback you’ve been given and then to proceed in a way that responds adequately while making the most of your time and retaining the core intentions of your work.

Join us Thursday, October 27, from 3-4 p.m. ET, for the TAA Webinar, “Manuscript Review in the Humanities: Embrace Criticism and Stand Up For Your Ideas,” led by Katie Van Heest, PhD, of Tweed Editing, where you will learn how to respond to reviewer feedback on journal articles and book manuscripts. [Read more…]

Recognition for Review is focus for Peer Review Week 2016

Peer Review WeekTo honor and celebrate peer review, 20 organizations worked collaboratively to plan the second annual Peer Review Week, a week-long series of activities and events that will run September 19-25, 2016.

This year’s theme is Recognition for Review, and will explore all aspects of how those participating in review activity – in publishing, grant review, conference submissions, promotion and tenure, and more – should be recognized for their contribution. [Read more…]

International Forum for Teaching and Studies journal seeking papers

American Scholars PressThe International Forum of Teaching and Studies (IFOTS), a journal that focuses on the development and improvement of teaching within international contexts, has announced a call for papers for future issues.

IFOTS publishes articles, essays, and scholarly studies about education, teaching, learning, and culture studies within themes, including 21st Century learning, distance learning, K-12 education practices, faculty development/professional education, and more.

For more information on submitting a manuscript, visit the IFOTS website.


TAA members can submit their call for papers for inclusion in a new announcements page we are developing. Information should be sent to Kim Pawlak at Kim.Pawlak@TAAonline.net.

Join us 5/18 for the TAA webinar, ‘5 Ways to Use Your Dissertation for Publications’

Doing Qualitative Research OnlineJanet SalmonsYou spent a lot of time conducting research and writing a dissertation, thesis, or capstone project. You are well aware of the pressure to get your work published, in order to get hired or advance in your academic or professional field. Where do you start?

Janet Salmons, PhD, of Vision2Lead, Inc., mined every element of her dissertation to launch a publishing strategy that has resulted in five books, numerous chapters and cases, articles and blog posts. She created a typology of five options for drawing from, building on, or applying your student writing. This webinar is relevant those who have graduated recently as well as to people whose dissertations have been sitting on the shelf for a while. [Read more…]