The most useful textbook & academic posts of the week: December 7, 2018

Starve your distractions : Feed your focusOur weekly collection of posts from around the web contains a variety of topics beginning with the mental health of academics and the process of giving feedback on academic writing. We then explore some academic elements often challenging to writers: statistics and theory. Next we look at industry concerns when setting up a new academic journal and the impact of Plan S on society publishers. We continue with discussion of the relationship between measurement systems and impact goals as well as concerns related to scientific misconduct. Finally, as we approach the holiday season, we have a list of gift ideas for the academics on your list.

This week, as the end of academic semesters approach for many of us and the holidays add new elements of obligation to our already busy schedules, focus on this simple message – Starve your distractions : Feed your focus. Happy writing! [Read more…]

Academic writers tackle social issues

Social IssuesWhether the discussion is about changes to our global climate or our cultural climate, the dominance of uninformed opinions can aggravate those of us who want to see the need for evidence derived from empirical research.

Academic writing for social good supports efforts for change to improve the well-being of people in our communities or around the world. While we might hope that all academic writing has potential to benefit society, the kinds of writing we are considering here have an intentional purpose. In a TAA webinar offered last year, Lynn Wilson and I discussed four ways that scholars and researchers can frame their writing. (View the recording here.) Let’s look at each one. [Read more…]

TweetChat Recap: #AcWriChat 11/3 – Get Organized

AcWriMoOn November 3rd, TAA co-hosted its first TweetChat event with SAGE Methodspace as part of Academic Writing Month (AcWriMo). The focus on this event was getting organized with your academic writing projects. Six questions were presented during the hour-long event on type of project, inspiration, organization steps, audience influence, desired impact, and next steps. The full conversation is available in the Storify record below. Mark your calendar and join the discussion this Friday, November 17th at 11am ET as we discuss writing productivity. Simply log in to your Twitter account and search for #AcWriChat. As questions are posted, tag your responses with the #AcWriChat hashtag. See you there! [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: July 24, 2015

Wouldn’t it be nice if in fact inspiration truth is... inspiration doesn't always just stike when we need itwould strike at just the very moment we need it? Sometimes I like to live in the delusion that it will, but really, it’s often deadlines that spark the most “inspiration.” Maybe you know this feeling too. We can try and force inspiration (like a deadline), but really it is in the moments that we aren’t looking for it that inspiration strikes. Maybe that is the key—to not go looking for it—to let it come on it’s own. Or, if all else fails follow the brilliant advice of Peter De Vries, “I write when I’m inspired, and I see to it that I’m inspired at nine o’clock every morning.

Happy writing! [Read more…]