The most useful textbook & academic posts of the week: April 6, 2018

"Of course, I tried to surround myself with other people like me whose dream of writing was a constant burden...." ~Gerald OlsonGerald Olson once said, “Of course, I tried to surround myself with other people like me whose dream of writing was a constant burden….” Our collection of articles this week identify and address some of the burdens associated with academic and textbook writing as well as some opportunities to surround yourself with other authors facing the same.

We begin with articles discussing burdens of racism in scholarly publishing, summarizing your research into a couple of sentences, personal branding, author processing charges for open access publishing, and changes in peer review. We also found suggestions on ways to broaden your audience with video, to access a larger set of figures and images, and an opportunity to browse and download content from SAGE journals during their open access month.

Whatever your burden in writing, we’re glad you are connected with TAA and the authors who share your dream and passion for textbook and academic writing. This week we encourage you to connect more, to identify your challenges, and to find new ways to be successful in your writing efforts. [Read more…]

How to track down permission guidelines for Internet images

Q: “I’d like to use images in a textbook I’m working on. What are the copyright issues around using Internet images? Can anything found on the Internet be published? If not, where does one go to get permission? Are there any working guidelines?”

A: Frank Wilson, Professor of Mathematics, Chandler-Gilbert Community College, Chandler, AZ:

“When I wanted to use an image from weather.com, I tracked down permissions guidelines from the website and requested permission to use the image. Permission was granted and my publisher took it from there. However, due to the difficulty in tracking down permissions guidelines for many online images, I have chosen to select most of my images from commercial stock photo websites such as www.corbis.com. The site has a plethora of high quality images and my publisher is accustomed to working with this company on permissions. Another company is Getty Images.” [Read more…]