Writing in tribute: Don’t wait for the eulogy!

Thank youRecently I received some professional praise and recognition. One was in public,  the TAA Mike Keedy Award and the other was in private, a few sentences in an other-wise business-as-usual email. At first, I felt simply flattered. How nice! But as I reflected on the comments, I realized they were more than just sweet talk. The remarks confirmed that I am making progress toward accomplishing what I have set out to do at this point in my career. They helped me confirm priorities and set steps for continued improvement. In the digital age, we can write, post, and give webinars. We can read site analytics, but we can’t read the audience. Are they paying attention or are eyelids drooping? Are they reading or just scrolling? In absence of visual cues, it helped me to hear that my messages are getting through. [Read more…]

5 Hopeful changes in the publishing industry in 2018

changeRecently we asked several TAA members the question, “What changes are you hoping to see within the publishing industry this year?” Five key changes were identified: improvements in self-publishing, technology-driven innovations, better peer-review processes, increases in open access publishing, and a new era of transparency in publisher-author communication. [Read more…]

Subject matter experts wanted to review virtual reality modules

reviewAn EdTech company is seeking subject matter experts in biology, physics, chemistry, and math to review content for virtual reality modules. Qualifications include: experience writing content, reviewing textbooks, designing curriculum, or developmental editing.

The scripts for these virtual reality modules need to be reviewed for pedagogy, accuracy, and general writing style. There are two phases to the review process: a Preflight, which requires an evaluation of an outline, and a Blueprint, which requires reviewing a complete script. Each preflight requires about 2 hours; each blueprint 4-5 hours. The turnaround time is 2 days. [Read more…]

Learn how to respond to reviewer feedback
Join us 10/27 for TAA webinar on manuscript review in the humanities

Katie Van HeestAfter peer review but before publication, even the best manuscripts typically require revision. When you are faced with readers’ reports, it’s key to understand clearly the feedback you’ve been given and then to proceed in a way that responds adequately while making the most of your time and retaining the core intentions of your work.

Join us Thursday, October 27, from 3-4 p.m. ET, for the TAA Webinar, “Manuscript Review in the Humanities: Embrace Criticism and Stand Up For Your Ideas,” led by Katie Van Heest, PhD, of Tweed Editing, where you will learn how to respond to reviewer feedback on journal articles and book manuscripts. [Read more…]

Recognition for Review is focus for Peer Review Week 2016

Peer Review WeekTo honor and celebrate peer review, 20 organizations worked collaboratively to plan the second annual Peer Review Week, a week-long series of activities and events that will run September 19-25, 2016.

This year’s theme is Recognition for Review, and will explore all aspects of how those participating in review activity – in publishing, grant review, conference submissions, promotion and tenure, and more – should be recognized for their contribution. [Read more…]

How to be an effective writing accountability partner

Has a colleague asked you to be theiraccountability writing accountability partner? Accountability partners provide guidance, support, and motivation for a writer to forge ahead and stay on course with their writing. They also have a general interest in the writing success of the other person and can offer their own, different experiences, perspectives and ideas. All these things combined will help a writer overcome their challenges and barriers to writing success so they can be more productive, motivated, and able to reach their writing goals. To be an effective writing accountability partner, you need to be able to do these four things: [Read more…]

Peer Review Week [#PeerRevWk15]

This week is the first ever Peer Review Week. Peer Review Week 2015ORCID, ScienceOpen, Sense About Science, and Wiley launched this idea and will be sharing various posts, webinars, and other activities throughout the week. Many more organizations and scholars are expected (and already are) tweeting and blogging about peer review. You can follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag: #PeerRevWk15.

To join in on Peer Review Week, we’re highlighting some of our past articles on peer review: [Read more…]

The nuts & bolts of writing a book review

textbook stackAs a scholar and a writer, I am surrounded by books. I buy books at conferences. I buy books online.  A stack of books grows on my desk, and even finds its way onto any horizontal surface in my living room.  I identify them from reading the reference list of journal articles. I get recommendations from peers.

One of the services I can provide my peers is to write a book review on one of my most recently purchased books. A review serves to help my colleagues decide whether or not they wish to read the book. [Read more…]

6 Reasons to participate in a writing boot camp

Nothing Worth Doing is Ever EasyAshley Sanders, a doctoral candidate at Michigan State University and leader of TAA’s Dissertators United Chapter Writing Boot Camps, (the second boot camp, “Writing With POWER”, will be held Sept. 20-21. Register today) shares these six reasons to participate in a writing boot camp:

(1) Create space and time in our schedules to make significant progress on our writing goals
(2) Develop goal-setting skills
(3) Increase the writers’ awareness of their own process through writing logs
(4) Share writing resources
(5) Determine sustainable writing habits
(6) Offer both camaraderie and accountability

Read Ashley’s article about writing boot camps on Inside Higher Ed [Read more…]

5 Approaches to writing group success

Writing GroupWriting groups offer their members a wealth of benefits. In fact, studies indicate that membership in a writing group can actually help boost your publication rate. In an examination of the publication rate of 48 female medical school faculty before and after participating in a writing group, Sonnad et al. found that the professors’ average publication rate increased from 1.5 papers per year to 4.5 papers per year after joining the writing group. Cumbie et al. also describe increases in productivity among writing group members, reporting “significant and positive writing outcomes in the form of manuscripts submitted for publication, abstracts submitted for conference presentations, [and] grant proposals developed.” [Read more…]