3 Most important skills a textbook author needs to have

Sean W. Wakely, author of Writing and Developing Your College Textbook: A Comprehensive Guide, shares the three most important skills a textbook author needs to have.

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Kick-off your summer writing with these posts from the blogosphere

summer writingWhen summer rolls around, it can seem almost impossible to get work done. With the beautiful weather, neighborhood barbeques, and days poolside, our desks begin to sound like one of the last places we would like to spend the day. But, believe it or not, summer can also bring new inspiration and a breath of fresh air for your writing. A new season brings new ideas and perspectives perfect for fighting off writer’s block and beating procrastination. Even as I am sitting out on my back porch writing this, I feel rejuvenated and ready to tackle each project that comes my way. Here I’ve shared posts that can help you tackle some projects of your own and stay on track this summer season. [Read More…]

32 Ways to market yourself with no money + some time (for academics)

During part two of author, workshop leader, and coach Meggin McIntosh’s TAA webinar, “Marketing? You’re Kidding Me! I’m an Academic! Marketing That Matters“, she shared these 32 ways academics can market themselves with no money, but some time.

1) Use social media, including Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and blogs in ALL various ways possible that will allow you to promote you and what you offer. Show people that you are the expert.

2) Phone prospective clients and current clients to follow-up and ask for referrals, references, “what worked?”, and the like.

Kathleen King inducted into the TAA Council of Fellows

Kathleen King was inducted into the TAA Council of Fellows during an awards ceremony held in conjunction with the TAA annual conference in Providence, Rhode Island June 9.

The TAA Council of Fellows honors distinguished authors who have a long record of successful publishing, whose textbook or other instructional materials have established his/her presence in the market place over time, and who has been innovative in the presentation of material. Induction into the Council of Fellows is the premier honor bestowed by TAA.

TAA recognizes members who have made exemplary contributions to the association

Several TAA members were recognized for exemplary contributions to the association over the past year during an awards ceremony held at the 2017 TAA Conference in Providence, RI June 9.

The President’s Award was presented to Karen Morris in recognition of her exceptional service to TAA. The award was given by TAA Council President Steven Barkan. In honoring her, Barkan said: “Not only was Karen a wonderful leader of the organization while she was president, but she was a terrific advisor and ‘wise counsel’ for me as we faced new questions during my tenure. Over the past two years, Karen has continued to chair and serve on key committees of TAA, leading the Council of Fellows Committee, and establishing the Awards committee that determines our Council Award winners.”

Intellectual property attorney: First-time textbook author has leverage in contract negotiations

Stephen E. Gillen, author of Writing and Developing Your College Textbook: A Comprehensive Guide, says the first-time textbook author definitely has leverage in contract negotiations, and can negotiate changes in the standard publishing agreement.


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Cengage print materials to include certification seal to fight counterfeiters

Beginning with shipments currently underway to on-campus, off-campus and online retailers, Cengage print products will include a unique certification seal developed by an expert third-party certification company. The seal includes a QR code and one-off indicators that verify the product’s authenticity. Cengage estimates that counterfeit course materials cost the company between $70 million to $100 million annually. 

6 Tips for avoiding website agita

As writers and academics, most of us recognize the necessity of having a website about our work and services. With WordPress and other DIY websites becoming ever easier, many writers are savvy enough to design and mount their own sites. But some of us aren’t, or can’t face trekking up that learning curve.

When I needed a website for publication of my book, Trust Your Life: Forgive Yourself and Go After Your Dreams, at first I procrastinated mightily. I didn’t want a prepackaged site (à la WordPress), although they can be fine. I knew I needed a site for promotion and wanted one that reflected the themes and gorgeous cover of my book. I was willing to spend a few dollars. So, to allay if not cure my website agita, I hired a professional web designer.

Once I did, I learned some shocking lessons. Whether you intend to create your own site, redesign it, or hire a specialist, I share my baptism warnings and questions to help ease your plunge into the arctic waters of the website world.

5 Strategies for using social media to promote your writing

The purpose of using social media as an academic is to do more than spread the word, it is also a way to develop readers and relationships, said Janet Salmons, an independent researcher, writer and consultant with Vision2Lead, Inc., in a TAA webinar entitled, “Six Strategies for Using Social Media to Promote Your Writing.” “What’s […]

The not-always-obvious ‘infrastructure’ of journal articles: Abstracts and textual linkages

Not all who wander are lost.  In fact, some who wander are not lost but just exploring the terrain. Yet, when I read a journal article, I do not want to wander and wonder where the work is headed. Partly because of my busy schedule and largely because I am seeking ideas, information and even inspiration, I want to know right away what the scholarly work is about. Scholars can guide readers along a smooth reading road by paying attention to the not-so-obvious infrastructure of typical journal articles and writing their submissions with this structure in mind.