9/17 TAA Webinar – Publish & Prosper: Strategies for Becoming a More Productive Scholar

Nathaniel Lambertpublish_and_prosperJoin us Wednesday, September 17 from 5-6 p.m. EDT for the one-hour webinar, “Publish & Prosper: Strategies for Becoming a More Productive Scholar,” presented by Nathaniel Mark Lambert, Ph.D., author of Publish and Prosper: A Strategy Guide for Students and Researchers. Free for Members. Click here to register
. Non-members: Join TAA for only $30.

Intended to help you succeed in academia by increasing your scholarly productivity, this webinar provides strategies for getting articles published quickly in reputable research journals. Rather than focusing on the basics of writing about results, this unique webinar provides tips on how to approach research, maintain motivation, maximize productivity, and overcome common pitfalls so as to become a productive scholar. The strategies reviewed will help you successfully navigate through graduate school, get a good job, receive grants and promotions, and make important contributions to your field. [Read more…]

WEBINAR: Confronting the Anxiety of Academic Writing

Becoming an effective academic writer is one of the key challenges facing doctoral students and early career researchers. Despite the centrality of writing, few writers feel comfortable with the process or confident about their product.  Rachael Cayley, author of the blog, Explorations of Style, discusses the anxiety that attends academic writing.

Rachael Cayley is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto. She teaches academic writing and speaking to graduate students. Before joining the University of Toronto, she worked as an editor at Oxford University Press in Toronto. She has a PhD in philosophy from the New School for Social Research and a BA in political science from the University of British Columbia. Rachael blogs at Explorations of Style and tweets at @explorstyle. 

How to deal with rejection in academic publishing

WritingRejection can certainly be discouraging, but it doesn’t have to mean the end of a project. It is important to move forward after your work is rejected and there are some steps you can take to avoid rejection altogether.

Overcoming disappointment is often one of the first things an academic author must face after a rejection. Dannielle Joy Davis, an Associate Professor of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Law at Alabama State University and a new co-editor for the journal Learning for Democracy, recommends setting aside a finite amount of time to feel disappointed before moving on and taking steps to resubmit. “I always send [a rejected paper] back out to a refereed venue and do not dwell on disappointment for more than 24 hours,” she said. [Read more…]