The most useful textbook & academic posts of the week: May 18, 2018

"If your writing doesn't keep you up at night, it won't keep anyone else up either." ~James M. CainThis week’s collection of articles from around the web begins with helpful advice on managing your writing time, your summer, and your academic career path from Masters to PhD. We then explore successful practices for crafting introductions, conducting a rapid evidence reviewing form of literature review, incorporating figures, understanding peer review, and writing successful grant applications. Finally, we review industry trends in writing discussions to journal papers, the evolution of the open access ecosystem, a new open access publishing platform for the social sciences, faculty presence in the open education movement, and the meaning of “inclusive” in digital textbook publishing.

James M. Cain suggests that “If your writing doesn’t keep you up at night, it won’t keep anyone else up either.” As you write this week, focus on the things that keep you up at night – the ideas that burn the strongest on your mind even when you aren’t writing – so that your writing can inspire and awaken those who read it. [Read more…]

What a TAA grant can do for you

GrantsTAA offers two forms of grants – publication grants and contract review grants – to assist members and non-members with some of the expenses related to publishing their academic works and textbooks.

As the April 30th grant application deadline approaches, we asked several 2017 publication grant recipients for feedback on how a TAA grant has helped them. [Read more…]

Hughes receives TAA Publication Grant

Sabrina HughesSabrina Hughes, a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, Florida, was awarded a TAA Publication Grant to cover expenses associated with the publishing of her article, “Imag(in)ing Paris for Posterity,” to be published in Future Anterior, the historic preservation journal of Columbia University, published by the University of Minnesota Press.

“Receiving the TAA grant is such an honor,” said Hughes. “Publishing art history articles can be very costly because of the necessity of image reproductions to the article. I’m a photography historian, which adds another level of complexity and expense since there are often additional licensing fees that come along with publishing photographs. This grant is an invaluable gift to emerging scholars who, like myself, are publishing independent of institutional financial backing.” [Read more…]

3 Tips for writing a successful grant application

Q: “I need to write my first grant application. What are the elements I need to include to ensure that my project is funded?”

A: Elaine M. Hull, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Florida State University, and the recipient of 20 years of NIH funding, shares three basics tips:

  1. The proposed research should answer an important question, have justification based on previous work and/or pilot data, and have a reasonable end point. Emphasize hypothesis testing, as opposed to a ‘fishing expedition.’ State how the outcome of the project will relate back to the ‘Big Issues’.
  2. Present the idea clearly. Organize paragraphs and write in short, clear sentences. Anticipate potential questions and criticisms. A diagram is worth more than the space it takes up.
  3. Don’t be discouraged by rejection. It’s unusual to get funding from the NSF or NIH on the first try. Seek advice from a person in the grant agency or another expert in the field.