What to do when you receive a revise & resubmit decision

quality controlIn her recent webinar, “An Editor’s View From Journal Article Submission to Publication”, Micki M. Caskey discussed the aspects of a Revise & Resubmit (R&R) decision from a publisher and what authors should do in response to such a decision.

First, she says, “celebrate the decision”. Then, respond to the reviewer feedback. [Read more…]

Feedback: Ah, just right

A woman seated on a bed sampling foodsUndoubtedly, we all know the story of Goldilocks and Three Bears. The part I have in mind, is when Goldilocks seeks equilibrium: porridge neither too hot nor cold and a bed neither too soft nor too hard.

Many authors seek out feedback or opinions on their work before submission. Of course, peer review will yield comments and likely things to change or address. All this feedback has value, but it is important to cast it in the right light. [Read more…]

Getting early feedback on your writing: Turning good into great

dance floorSharing your writing in its early forms can cause anxiety. I liken it to going to a middle school dance. It seems like a good idea, but it is laced with a fear of rejection and insecurity.

Developing positive habits early in your writing career, however, are important. Seeking feedback makes writers better and more confident.  Here are six ideas to help move you toward embracing the valuable feedback loop: [Read more…]

3 Ways to receive productive feedback

Hand reaching out to offer assistanceFeedback is an essential component of most things we do in life, especially our writing processes. However, the wrong type of feedback can be at best not useful, and at worst, harmful to the process.

Here are three things that you can do to improve your chances of receiving productive feedback.

1) Ask for feedback in ways that will be helpful

Getting the answers that you need from the feedback process requires asking the questions that will encourage the most useful response. [Read more…]

Q&A: Tips on receiving feedback from students when you’re not teaching

FeedbackQ: “How do you get feedback from students about your book when you are not teaching?”

A: Karen Timberlake, author of Basic Chemistry, winner of a 2006 Texty Award:

“Use a focus group. Bring in students (from a local school using your book) for an afternoon and ask them questions about it.”

A: Marilyn “Winkie” Fordney, author of textbooks on insurance billing and medical transcription:

“I created a questionnaire and gave it to faculty using my book, asking them to have their students fill it out.”