Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: February 19, 2021

How do you define success? As you refine your writing practice, especially in an environment constantly changing, it’s important to be able to answer this question. David M. Burns cautions, however that success does not equal reflection. “Aim for success, not perfection. Never give up your right to be wrong, because then you will lose the ability to learn new things and move forward with your life. Remember that fear always lurks behind perfectionism.” Success requires overcoming fear and moving forward.

Our collection of articles this week includes some practical advice on common challenges academic authors face.

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: June 26, 2015

Can you believe that we are already at the end of June? Have you found yourself sticking to your writing goals or does hearing that it’s the end of June make you want to run screaming in panic? You might not be screaming in panic, but you might be quickly assessing all that you have and have yet to accomplish this summer to meet the goals you set for yourself this past spring. Luckily, many of the articles below are focused on summer writing. Some reassuring there is still plenty of time to be productive and others on productivity and realistic writing schedules.

How to write a book proposal for an academic press

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How to reach out to potential textbook publishers

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How to pitch a piece of writing

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Q&A: What is the likelihood of a textbook publisher ‘cloning’ your textbook?

Q: “I am working on a different kind of developmental mathematics textbook. It is very difficult, nowadays, to distinguish between current Mathematics textbooks. Mine looks, feels, and reads in a very different unique way. I’ve presented it to one publisher and they are interested. I know that it is to my advantage to approach other publishers, however, should I be concerned that if I do, that they will ‘clone’ my text?”

A: Michael D. Spiegler, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychology, Providence College:

“If you have a good way of approaching the subject matter, others will imitate once your book comes out. You may have an edge as the original. And you’ve made a contribution to the students in your field beyond just your book. It may be possible to get a publisher to sign an agreement stating that they will not come out with a book that clones yours for a given time period. I’ve heard of this being done with other ideas and industry. I’d suggest you consult with a good intellectual property lawyer on this idea. And remember, imitation is the highest form of strategy (or something like that).”