Member Spotlight: Corey S. Shdaimah

TAA Member Corey S Shdaimah is the Daniel Thursz Distinguished Professor of Social Justice at the University of Maryland School of Social Work and an academic author in the social work and policy implementation writing disciplines. Her latest publication is Social Welfare Policy in a Changing World.

She is currently working on two books- Research Handbook on Law, Movements, and Social Change with co-editors Steven Boutcher and Michael Yarbrough (forthcoming, Edward Elgar) and The Compassionate Court: Support, Surveillance, and Survival in Two Court-Affiliated Prostitution Diversion Programs with co-author Shelly Wiechelt (forthcoming, Temple University Press).

Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: January 14, 2022

Why do you write? Are you writing to share you knowledge with others? Are you writing to get the thoughts out of your head and onto paper? Perhaps, here at the start of the year, you are writing (or not) because you have resolved to do so. Or are you like Flannery O’Connor who said, “I write to discover what I know.”

In this week’s collection of articles from around the web, we find insight on new years’s resolutions for authors, writing deadlines, writing strategies, the end of writer self-doubt, and the future of open access. Whatever your reasoning, we encourage you to write every day. Happy writing!

Member Spotlight: Cason Murphy

TAA Member Cason Murphy is an Assistant Professor of Theatre at Iowa State University and a textbook and academic author in the theater, music studies, dance studies, media studies, critical reinterpretation of the canon, and contemporary performance practices writing disciplines. His latest publication is The World at Play: Performance from the Audience’s Perspective.

Since he just completed his first textbook earlier this year, he has engaged in several smaller projects for now: a few performance reviews for theatre journals; fleshing out an essay from a conference proceeding on teaching a musical theatre performance class during the pandemic; and a survey of several video game-inspired theatrical performances that resulted from experimentation over the past 20 months.

Most useful textbook and academic posts of the week: January 7, 2022

How do you write? As we begin the new year of 2022, it’s a perfect time to reflect on your writing goals, habits, accomplishments, and shortcomings from last year and look at what adjustments may be necessary for the year ahead.

Our collection of articles from around the web for this first week of 2022 includes The Scholarly Kitchen‘s year in review, Jane Friedman’s insight on what writers need to do, and the publishing industry’s projection on the continued effect of COVID-19 on returning to the office. The set continues with a vision for a new model library, Joanna Penn’s creative and business goals for the new year, and ends with four strategies for writing in a world of distractions.

Stephen King once described his answer to our opening question, saying, “When asked, ‘How do you write?’ I invariably answer, ‘one word at a time’.” It may be too much to look at the entire year ahead and plan your writing projects, so if necessary, start with just the next word in your project. Happy writing!