Three new writing templates added to TAA’s Templates & Samples Resource Library

Templates and SamplesThree new templates have been added to TAA’s Templates & Samples Resource Library – a grant requirements matrix template and writing collaboration planning and progress templates.

The grant requirements matrix template was contributed by Erin Comeaux, a grants coordinator with Pasadena ISD, and Jennifer Travis, a professor of mathematics at Lone Star College-North Harris, who use it to keep track of each grant requirement, as well as the solicition/RFP page number or URL, paragraph number or URL, and who is responsible for drafting each requirement, to make sure all the grant’s instructions are being followed. [Read more…]

Academic grant writing tips from a pro (and lessons from a rookie)

GrantsA grant is a great tool to help you build or enhance your project or program, said Erin Comeaux (the pro), formerly a professional grant writer for Lone Star College System, and now a grants coordinator for Pasadena Independent School District in Pasadena, Texas, and Jennifer Travis (the rookie), a professor of mathematics at Lone Star College-North Harris, during their presentation at the 2016 Conference in San Antonio in June. The two recently partnered to write Travis’ first grant proposal. [Read more…]

Apply for a TAA Academic or Textbook Writing Grant

TAA LogoTAA offers two forms of grants to assist members and non-members with some of the expenses related to publishing their academic works and textbooks. Publication Grants provide reimbursement for eligible expenses directly related to bringing an academic book, textbook, or journal article to publication. Contract Review Grants reimburse eligible expenses for legal review when you have a contract offer for a textbook or academic monograph or other scholarly work that includes royalty arrangements. The deadline for submitting a grant application is October 31 (grants are awarded December 31). Visit the TAA Grants page for more information or to apply.

Apply for a TAA grant to offset academic or textbook writing expenses

grant writing folderLooking for funding to offset some of the expenses related to publishing your academic works or textbooks? TAA offers publication grants and contract review grants of up to $1,000.

The next grant application deadline is October 1. [Read more…]

Prolific grant writer shares his advice on landing grants

grant writing folderThe key element in grant writing is attitude, said Kenneth Henson, distinguished professor at the Citadel’s School of Education, and author of a new book by Allyn & Bacon, Grant Writing in Higher Education: A Step-by-Step Guide. “You have to believe that you can take it as far as you want to as long as you’re willing to work hard,” said Henson, during his TAA Convention presentation, “Grant Writing in Higher Education,” in Las Vegas, June 22. “If you don’t have a belief in your ability to succeed, it’s not going to happen.” [Read more…]

Grant-writing: A game you can win

Grant writing is fun! It’s a way to get a lot of money, and more. I love it because it’s a game I know I can win. You can, too, if you use my game plan.

A former University of Florida classmate, whom I believe to be one of the best football coaches in the country today, recently gave us the first key to winning. When losing a game, he said, “I guess we just didn’t want it badly enough.” Like sports, grant-writing is competitive. Winning requires a plan, and more; it requires passion. Here’s my plan.

Step 1: Believe in yourself. I tell my workshop participants that they can reach any level they are willing to work for, and for three decades they have proven me right. You can, too. Just follow these steps.

Step 2: Play to win. Avoid the trap of those who just like to talk about the game. Grant writing is not a spectator sport. Decide up front that you are going to win. This passion will give you the drive and energy to reach the finish line.

Step 3: Choose a winning topic. Note your journals’ coming themes, your forthcoming conventions’ themes, and the keynote speakers’ topics. From these, choose a topic that you like, I mean really like. This passion will put you on top.

Step 4: Choose the right funding source. Just go to the Federal Register, which lists all the funded grants in the country. Here, you can see who is funding grants on your preferred topics. In other words, align your preferred topics with agencies who also embrace these topics.

Step 5: Use the requests for proposals (rfps). I mean really use the rfps. When I write a grant, I literally put my finger on every line in the rfp and I don’t move it until I have responded to that item. Otherwise, it is easy to stray off on a tangent – pursing my goals instead of the funding agency’s goals. To win this game, you must keep the funding agency’s goals first and convince the reviewers that you will do a better job than the competition will do in reaching the sponsor’s goals.

Step 6: Put clarity first. Most proposal readers face tons of boring, hard-to-read proposals. You can help them escape this torture by giving them a clearly written proposal. Use short, jargon-free words, short sentences and short paragraphs. These readers aren’t impressed with unfamiliar words and complex writing. On the contrary, they are impressed with good ideas, presented clearly.

Step 7: Include some unique features. Imagine a lonely grant proposal reviewer, sitting hour-after-hour, plowing through dozens of poorly-written proposals. Then, in acres of these proposals, the reviewer finds this unique proposal, one that offers a few fresh ideas.

Step 8: Develop a grant-writing workbook. Instead of thinking of grant-writing as a piecemeal, one-shot, or occasional project, make it an ongoing part of your professional life. Grant reviewers love data. I use a three-ring binder. As I find an important statistic, percentage, or quotable quote (a short statement that sends a powerful message), I put it in my binder and use it again and again.

Step 9: Contact the funding agency. I find two advantages in making contact with the funding agency. First, it makes the agents familiar with my proposal, even before they see it. Second, I listen for goals that are not found in the rfp. This gives me an advantage over all the competition.

To eliminate travel costs, I use the phone. Because these people are very busy, before calling, I make two bulleted lists: one, of things I want the agent to know about my proposal, the other, of agency goals that are not listed in the rfp.

Step 10: Attend a grant-writing workshop. I find that it takes about five hours to deliver all the nuts and bolts advice and examples that serious grant-writers need. Seek out an experienced speaker who uses clear and practical terms. Sit up close, ask questions, and take copious notes.

Like any sport, your love for grant-writing will improve as your skills improve. Good luck.

Kenneth Henson is Distinguished Professor of Education at The Citadel’s School of Education. He is the author of Grant Writing in Higher Education: A Step-by-Step Guide, published by Allyn & Bacon.

3 Tips for writing a successful grant application

Tips of the Trade ImageQ: “I need to write my first grant application. What are the elements I need to include to ensure that my project is funded?”

A: Elaine M. Hull, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Florida State University, and the recipient of 20 years of NIH funding, shares three basics tips:

  1. The proposed research should answer an important question, have justification based on previous work and/or pilot data, and have a reasonable end point. Emphasize hypothesis testing, as opposed to a ‘fishing expedition.’ State how the outcome of the project will relate back to the ‘Big Issues’.
  2. Present the idea clearly. Organize paragraphs and write in short, clear sentences. Anticipate potential questions and criticisms. A diagram is worth more than the space it takes up.
  3. Don’t be discouraged by rejection. It’s unusual to get funding from the NSF or NIH on the first try. Seek advice from a person in the grant agency or another expert in the field.

 

Tips to ensure your project is funded

Tips of the Trade ImageQ: “I need to write my first grant application. What are the elements I need to include to ensure that my project is funded?”

A: Elaine M. Hull, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Florida State University, and the recipient of 20 years of NIH funding, shares these basics tips for writing a proposal:

“1) The proposed research should answer an important question, have justification based on previous work and/or pilot data, and have a reasonable end point. Emphasize hypothesis testing, as opposed to a ‘fishing expedition.’ State how the outcome of the project will relate back to the ‘Big Issues’; 2) Present the idea clearly. Organize paragraphs and write in short, clear sentences. Anticipate potential questions and criticisms. A diagram is worth more than the space it takes up; 3) Don’t be discouraged by rejection. It’s unusual to get funding from the NSF or NIH on the first try. Seek advice from a person in the grant agency or another expert in the field.”

A: Kären Hess, the author or co-author of more than 30 trade books and college-level textbooks on a variety of topics including financial planning, dental marketing, art, literature, engineering, hospice care, reading, management and report writing:

“Key is a worthwhile idea about which the proposal writer is passionate, carefully formulated with a good chance of success. If there is an RFP, follow the guidelines exactly. Research the foundation and match the proposal to their stated mission statement.

Include a cover letter, a cover page, table of contents, statement of needs (problem statement), proposed solution or program strategy, goals and objectives, how and by whom implemented, timeline, pricing, how evaluated, qualifications of those involved (some grantors request resumes of all key personnel) and references if applicable.

As with book proposals, presentation is critical — – the axiom you never get a second chance to make a first impression applies. Use a good printer and quality paper with a professionally appearing binder. Never submit a handwritten proposal.”