5 Textbook authors share advice on coauthoring relationships

textbooksQ: “I am currently writing on my own but considering taking on a coauthor. What are some different ways that coauthors can work together?”

A: Maggie D.C. Finn, mfinn@nycc.edu:

“One simple way is to use Word in ‘Track Changes’ mode. That way drafts can be send back and forth electronically and you can quickly see where your coauthor has added or edited something.” [Read more…]

A veteran textbook author’s insights on contracts, author collaboration & more: An interview with Ric Martini

Ric Martini

Ric Martini

Ric Martini Anatomy and Physiology textbooks

Frederic (“Ric”) Martini received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in comparative and functional anatomy for work on the pathophysiology of stress. He is the lead author of ten undergraduate texts on anatomy and physiology or anatomy. Martini is currently affiliated with the University of Hawaii at Manoa and has a long-standing bond with the Shoals Marine Laboratory, a joint venture between Cornell University and the University of New Hampshire.

A veteran textbook author, here Martini shares his insights on publishing contracts, author collaboration, and more. [Read more…]

What to consider before co-authoring

Writing Accountability PartnerCo-authorship can be an extremely valuable experience for academic authors, but it can also pose unique challenges. When selecting a co-author it is important to consider several factors—including his or her area of expertise, writing ability and personality—in order to ensure that the co-author experience is a positive and successful one. It is also important to assess a potential co-author’s level of commitment to ensure that all parties are truly vested in the project. [Read more…]

Lawyer: Rosy textbook co-author prospects can sour

Textbook PublishingAlthough co-authorship has many advantages, there are also meaningful risks that no one likes to contemplate at the outset of the relationship, said Stephen Gillen, an attorney with Wood, Herron & Evans, L.L.P. “There are many stresses and many opportunities for the relationship to sour and much temptation at finger pointing,” he said. “While most collaborations/co-authorships end the way they start — on a distinctly positive note, when things go bad, they go very, very bad.” Gillen said co-author disputes are among the most rancorous disputes he deals with: “The strategy most often in evidence is one borrowed from the Cold War — assured mutual destruction.” [Read more…]