Self-publishing workshop offered at TAA’s 27th annual authoring conference

2014 TAA Conference logoTAA’s 2014 Conference on Textbook & Academic Writing in Baltimore, MD, June 20-21, will include a new track on “Self-Publishing”. The track will feature a workshop designed for both novice and veteran authors who want to experience a hands-on approach to marketing their book to readers and buyers. Attendees will learn how to raise money to get a book printed and marketed, what to look for in hiring an editor, and how to find a publisher for a manuscript. [Read more…]

New TAA Publication Grants awarded

Dr. Amy Rebecca Gansell

Dr. Gansell

Dr. Amy Rebecca Gansell of St. John’s University, Drs. Jan-Willem van de Meent and Chris H. Wiggins, and doctoral candidate Sakellarios Zairis of Columbia University were recently awarded a $1,000 TAA Publication Grant to help cover the cost of photos for their forthcoming article, “Stylistic Clusters and the Syrian/South Syrian Tradition of First-Millennium BCE Levantine Ivory Carving: a Machine Learning Approach”. The article, which was published online in November 2013 in the Journal of Archaeological Science, will be published in print in the spring of 2014.

“I am very grateful for TAA’s grant, which subvents the costs of publishing color illustrations of scientific diagrams and five previously unpublished ancient sculptures,” said Gansell. [Read more…]

2014 TAA Conference to feature track on writing craft

2014conf_logo_squareTAA’s 2014 Conference on Textbook & Academic Writing in Baltimore, MD, June 20-21, will include a new track on “Writing Craft”. The track will feature four presentations by veteran textbook and academic writers in the form of sessions, workshops and roundtable discussions, including:

Bingo! It’s a Match! Selecting an Academic Journal for Publication, presented by Dannelle D. Stevens
Confessions of a Reluctant Author: How to Write a Book When You Don’t Like to Write, presented by Susan Robison
Yikes! My Journal Article Was Rejected? Why & What to Do About It, presented by Dannelle D. Stevens
Academic Life Vests: Learning to Manage Multiple Writing Projects, presented by Tracey S. Hodges and Katherine Landau Wright

Visit the 2014 TAA Conference website to learn more about these sessions and to register.

Time management strategies: Take a time inventory

Time managementHow do you get long-term projects done, given day-to-day realities? It can certainly be a challenge, especially if you suffer from procrastination and disorganization, says William Weare, Access Services Team Leader at the University Library at Indiana University-Purdue, and author of several journal articles, conference papers, and a book chapter on time management for academic librarians.

One of the strategies he has used to become more productive is taking a time inventory to visually see where his time goes. [Read more…]

Video: Join the TAA authoring community

TAA LogoJoin TAA today to gain access to the key resources you need to succeed as a textbook writer and academic author. TAA membership is open to individuals, colleges, universities, organizations and industry professionals.

As a TAA member, you have access to a host of benefits designed to maximize your authoring success, including an online member community, live webinars and more than 100+ presentations on demand, a templates & samples resource library, writing grants, and a print newsletter.

Watch this video to learn more about how TAA can benefit you.

19 Tips for getting published in academia

Tips for putting words on the page

Excerpted from an article that originally appeared in The Chronicle of Higher Education by Rachel Toor.

“Frequently I talk with academics who feel they don’t write enough. Even people with a tenure blade dangling over their cervical vertebrae don’t usually have to reach far to find justifications for not getting stuff done. I don’t want to use the word ‘excuses,’ because they are often valid and real problems, and I don’t want to minimize how hard it is to have something to say and find the right way to say it.

Friends of mine who are in the creative-writing field (such a strange misnomer; what writing, I ask, is not creative?) mostly don’t have a hard time finding the discipline to get the writing done. It’s the most important thing we do—even those of us who have day jobs as professors—because it often goes to the deepest issues of identity. It’s not only what we do but who we are. If we are not writing, we are nothing. For many academics, however, writing is what comes after the real and engaging work. It’s like having to wash the dishes after preparing an elaborate meal.”

Toor asks, “What can scholars learn from other kinds of writers to help them put words on the page?”

6 Ways to identify predatory open access journal publishers

Predatory open-access journal publishers have increased exponentially in recent years, and a new publisher can be created in a single day, said Jeffrey Beall, a scholarly librarian at the University of Colorado Denver, and author of Scholarly Open Access, a blog that tracks and critically analyzes questionable open access publishers and journals.

To help you avoid becoming a target of one of these predatory publishers, Beall offers 6 warning signs to help you identify them: The journal does not identify a formal editorial/review board.

View Beall’s list of predatory publishers on his blog, Scholarly Open Access.

How to determine author order when collaborating with multiple authors

Determining author orderWhen multiple authors collaborate to write a journal article, the task of determining authorship order inevitably arises. In some situations, the order may be obvious, but in many cases, it can be difficult to decide, and having a plan in place to establish author order can help the process go more smoothly.

Collaborating authors are usually listed in order of the relative size of each author’s contribution to the article, but sometimes it can be a challenge to gauge the size or importance of each author’s contributions. One way of facing this challenge is to take a mathematical approach to determining each author’s [Read more…]

Insights on working with editors: An interview with Elsa Peterson

Elsa Peterson

Elsa Peterson

Copyright and PermissionsElsa Peterson has more than 20 years of experience in textbook and academic publishing as a freelance permissions editor, picture researcher, and developmental editor. Her most recent in-house position was as a senior developmental editor for psychology with McGraw-Hill Higher Education. Peterson recently authored a brief and accessible guide to copyright in the context of publishing titled Copyright and Permissions: What Every Writer and Editor Should Know (New York: Editorial Freelancers Association, 2012). She has also authored numerous articles about the business and craft of editing, and has presented TAA audio conferences on editing and copyright.

Peterson spoke with TAA about the roles of editors and where they fit within the authoring process.

TAA: Can you describe the different editorial services you provide?

Elsa Peterson: “I primarily do developmental editing, which involves working closely with an author to bring the vision for the book to fruition. Development is a long-term process that usually begins with the author’s proposal and extends through the turnover of the manuscript to production. When I do permissions editing, my task is to identify all the material in a manuscript that is under copyright, find the rights holders, and secure their authorization to use the material. Similarly, picture research involves clearing permission to reproduce photographs and works of art; it also includes a creative dimension in helping the author to select the most effective visuals to convey the concepts being presented.” [Read more…]