9 Questions to help you discover your writing working preferences

Your Working EnvironmentIt’s hard enough to start, much less continue, our writing, scholarly or otherwise. When we ask ourselves some important questions and act on the answers, we can more easily sneak up on the current project and get started.

The questions and answers are completely between us and us, and we have the best and only answers. Whatever other advice we’ve read or heard, however loudly others swear theirs is the only way, it’s our answers to ourselves that matter.

For my own writing and that of the dissertation- and article-producing clients I coach, I’ve found the following questions are the most crucial and tell us what we need to know about our working preferences. Answer the questions below and others that may arise to diagnose your perfect work environment. [Read more…]

Dissertation support groups (part 2): Success!

SupportPreface: This is the second of two posts on dissertation support groups. In the previous piece, “Dissertation support groups (part 1): Watch out!”, I described several benefits and cautioned readers about drawbacks of a group. In this piece, I report on a successful group in the words of its founders and members. The philosophies and methods may help graduate students seeking support groups and faculty desiring to start them.

“I couldn’t write. I’d be in the library, staring at the portrait of the bearded benefactor, and the time would just tick by. That’s when I decided to join the group.”

This member of a dissertation support group was not alone in her dilemma. [Read more…]

PODCAST: The Four Paths to Publishing

Keith OgorekRecently, publishing has undergone an indie revolution similar to what occurred in the film and music industries. While these changes have made now the best time in history to be an author, they have also made it one of the most confusing. In this TAA podcast, recorded at the 2014 TAA Conference in Baltimore, Keith Ogorek, self-published author and industry thought leader, outlines four clear paths authors can now follow to reach their publishing goals; addressing each path’s advantages and disadvantages and what authors should consider as they look to publish.


Like this podcast? Join TAA and gain access to 100+ more. First-year membership is only $30.

Hudson, Whisenhunt receive TAA Textbook Contract Review Grant

Brooke Whisenhunt

Whisenhunt

Danae Hudson

Hudson

Danae Hudson and Brooke Whisenhunt have been awarded a TAA Textbook Contract Review Grant for their textbook, Introductory Psychology, to be published by Pearson Education.

“Being a textbook author for the first time is exciting, yet can also be overwhelming and expensive. I am so grateful for the support from TAA, not only from the contract review grant, but all of the resources and information they provide,” said Hudson, a clinical psychologist and associate professor in the Department of Psychology at Missouri State University.

“Trying to negotiate a textbook contract for the first time can certainly be a daunting process. Having support from the TAA to obtain legal advice helped make this process much more manageable. We are very grateful for this support and for the resources and contacts available through the TAA,” said Whisenhunt, a professor of psychology at Missouri State University.
[Read more…]

Tweetable tweets from 2014 TAA Conference attendees

Thank you to everyone who tweeted or shared tweets at the 2014 TAA Conference!

How to Write a Sophisticated, Dynamic Scholarly Argument

Tweed Gears

It is incumbent upon early-career academics to distinguish their research as mature scholarship, not student work. So as an editor who often works with junior faculty and recent PhDs, I’m always on the lookout for hallmarks of amateur writing that scholars can identify and excise.

Perhaps most academics can name some of the tics that unfortunately characterize graduate-student writing: overqualification, hedging, extensive literature review, and a high ratio of quotation to original material are just a few.

Another quirk I’ve noticed is that less effective manuscripts—whether they’re written by early-career scholars or not—tend to organize information into lists. That may not sound so damning, but lists become vulnerabilities when they are presented as arguments. [Read more…]

TAA offering discount conference rate to graduate students

2014conf_logo_squareTAA’s 2014 Conference on Textbook & Academic Writing in Baltimore, MD, June 20-21 is offering graduate students a discounted registration rate of $75. The discounted rate is available to TAA members and non-members and applies to both the one-day or two-day registration options.

TAA’s June conference features authoring sessions, workshops, and roundtable discussions that are designed to jumpstart your writing projects and boost your publishing success. Participants will have the opportunity to meet on-on-one with a veteran author or an authoring attorney and network with fellow authors at the evening hospitality events.

Visit the 2014 TAA Conference website to learn more about the conference program and to register at this discounted rate.

New TAA Publication Grants awarded

Dr. Amy Rebecca Gansell

Dr. Gansell

Dr. Amy Rebecca Gansell of St. John’s University, Drs. Jan-Willem van de Meent and Chris H. Wiggins, and doctoral candidate Sakellarios Zairis of Columbia University were recently awarded a $1,000 TAA Publication Grant to help cover the cost of photos for their forthcoming article, “Stylistic Clusters and the Syrian/South Syrian Tradition of First-Millennium BCE Levantine Ivory Carving: a Machine Learning Approach”. The article, which was published online in November 2013 in the Journal of Archaeological Science, will be published in print in the spring of 2014.

“I am very grateful for TAA’s grant, which subvents the costs of publishing color illustrations of scientific diagrams and five previously unpublished ancient sculptures,” said Gansell. [Read more…]

Tax tips for authors: Understand foreign taxes, tax credit and tax certification

Robert Pesce

Robert Pesce

Tax Tips for AuthorsIf you have sold your textbooks in foreign markets, foreign publishers may withhold foreign taxes at the source before the money is paid to your agent and before it is paid to you. If they are doing that, and you earned, for example, $10,000 in a foreign country, 10 percent, or $1,000, will have been withheld from your payment. Your agent would have received $9,000, and withheld his 15 percent commission on the $10,000 you actually earned. So you would end up getting about $7,500. [Read more…]

Tax tips for authors: Learn how your agent is reporting your writing income

Robert Pesce

Robert Pesce

Tax Tips for Authors

One of the things that can affect your tax returns is the income that you report from writing in the form of royalties, advances, etc. Many of you will have literary agents and those agents will report to you what you’ve earned at the end of a year on a 1099. While the IRS says that agencies are supposed to report to their clients the gross income amount that was received, most agencies report on the net basis, and the IRS doesn’t seem to be aware of, or care about that. But as an author, you really need to know on what basis your agent is reporting income because it could potentially affect your tax return. [Read more…]