The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: December 11, 2015

'A writer never has a vacation. For a writer, life consists of either writing or thinking about writing.' Eugene Ionesco This week brings an early Christmas present in the form of so many great articles on academic and textbook writing! Speaking of the gift-giving season, have you seen my Top 10 gift ideas for writers? Perhaps one of the greatest gifts family and friends can give you this time of year is a quiet space for you to write to keep your writing projects on track. Although that would be a great gift, it isn’t always possible with all the hustle and bustle of the holiday season. So what strategies do you use to find writing time during the holidays? Or, do you allow yourself to take a break from your writing?

As always, happy writing! [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: July 24, 2015

Wouldn’t it be nice if in fact inspiration truth is... inspiration doesn't always just stike when we need itwould strike at just the very moment we need it? Sometimes I like to live in the delusion that it will, but really, it’s often deadlines that spark the most “inspiration.” Maybe you know this feeling too. We can try and force inspiration (like a deadline), but really it is in the moments that we aren’t looking for it that inspiration strikes. Maybe that is the key—to not go looking for it—to let it come on it’s own. Or, if all else fails follow the brilliant advice of Peter De Vries, “I write when I’m inspired, and I see to it that I’m inspired at nine o’clock every morning.

Happy writing! [Read more…]

Beware of spam email from predatory journal publishers

Predatory PublishersTAA member Laura Frost recently received an email from a journal soliciting a paper based on her 2014 TAA Conference presentation. Since she had attended a session at the TAA conference presented by Jeffrey Beall, who discussed predatory journal publishers, she looked up the journal on Beall’s website, Scholarly Open Access, and found that this particular journal was listed as a predatory publisher.

She brought this to our attention and we have asked Beall to use the email she received to illustrate how to identify a predatory publisher from such emails. View email Frost received (highlighted text illustrates some of Beall’s identifiers)

“Many of the predatory publishers are in fact counterfeit publishers, and are very skilled at making themselves appear to be legitimate publishers,” said Beall. “Consequently, making a judgment about a publisher based only on a sample of its spam may not provide enough information to make a good decision.” [Read more…]

TAA Podcast – Millions of Articles, Thousands of Journals: How an Individual Scholarly Author Can Thrive in Today’s Scholarly Publishing Ecosystem

The changing scholarly publishing ecosystem provides new opportunities, and some perils, for scholarly authors. Listen to this session by Jeffrey Beall, “Millions of Articles, Thousands of Journals: How an Individual Scholarly Author Can Thrive in Today’s Scholarly Publishing Ecosystem,” recorded at the 2014 TAA Conference in Baltimore, MD, which addresses how authors can better expose, promote, and share their research to reach a larger audience and achieve greater impact.

Focusing on scholarly journals, it will update you on some of the problems associated with predatory publishing, such as research misconduct and the publication of pseudo-science. It will also help authors select publishers that provide greater added value to their work, such as basic copyediting and digital curation.


Download PPT [Read more…]

6 Ways to identify predatory open access journal publishers

Predatory open-access journal publishers have increased exponentially in recent years, and a new publisher can be created in a single day, said Jeffrey Beall, a scholarly librarian at the University of Colorado Denver, and author of Scholarly Open Access, a blog that tracks and critically analyzes questionable open access publishers and journals.

To help you avoid becoming a target of one of these predatory publishers, Beall offers 6 warning signs to help you identify them: The journal does not identify a formal editorial/review board.

View Beall’s list of predatory publishers on his blog, Scholarly Open Access.

Author Beware: Predatory scholarly journals, Insights on OA predatory publishing from Jeffrey Beall

Jeffrey Beall

Jeffrey Beall, Scholarly Initiatives Librarian at Auraria Library, University of Colorado Denver

The increase in popularity of online scholarly journals has given rise to new open-access publishing models, including the gold open-access model, in which authors often pay to have their accepted papers published. While there are advantages to this model, according to Jeffrey Beall, author of Scholarly Open Access, a blog which tracks and critically analyzes questionable online open-access journal publishers, some online journals are exploiting this model by engaging in predatory practices that defraud authors and dilute the quality of the corpus of scholarly literature.

During his 2013 TAA Conference presentation, “A Primer on Predatory Open-Access Scholarly Publishers”, Beall, Scholarly Initiatives Librarian at Auraria Library, University of Colorado Denver, outlined several disadvantages to the gold open-access publishing model that have opened the door for predatory publishers to abuse the model for their own profit. [Read more…]