The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: October 20, 2017

"Writing is more than a craft; it is a way of life. Everything you see or do becomes part of what you write." H.P. OliverH. P. Oliver shared that “Writing is more than a craft; it is a way of life. Everything you see or do becomes part of what you write.” While you have been busy writing this week, we’ve kept record of some noteworthy articles you may not have seen. Below you will find articles from the past week on understanding research metrics, when to write a press release, the future of open access publishing, considerations when writing a conference paper, barriers to research collaboration, peer review systems, and the ongoing discussion of traditional vs digital textbook materials. As you enter the week ahead, I hope you find ways to improve your writing, and therefore, your way of life. [Read more…]

Learn how to respond to reviewer feedback
Join us 10/27 for TAA webinar on manuscript review in the humanities

Katie Van HeestAfter peer review but before publication, even the best manuscripts typically require revision. When you are faced with readers’ reports, it’s key to understand clearly the feedback you’ve been given and then to proceed in a way that responds adequately while making the most of your time and retaining the core intentions of your work.

Join us Thursday, October 27, from 3-4 p.m. ET, for the TAA Webinar, “Manuscript Review in the Humanities: Embrace Criticism and Stand Up For Your Ideas,” led by Katie Van Heest, PhD, of Tweed Editing, where you will learn how to respond to reviewer feedback on journal articles and book manuscripts. [Read more…]

Recognition for Review is focus for Peer Review Week 2016

Peer Review WeekTo honor and celebrate peer review, 20 organizations worked collaboratively to plan the second annual Peer Review Week, a week-long series of activities and events that will run September 19-25, 2016.

This year’s theme is Recognition for Review, and will explore all aspects of how those participating in review activity – in publishing, grant review, conference submissions, promotion and tenure, and more – should be recognized for their contribution. [Read more…]

How writers can use feedback effectively

FeedbackA good writing practice—a habit of coming back to work on your project regularly—is the foundation of good writing. One of the biggest challenges to many writing practices is to keep going after receiving difficult feedback. And perhaps an even bigger challenge is the fear of receiving feedback, which often contributes to writer’s block. If you’re submitting to a publisher, a journal, to your dissertation committee, or anyone else who might provide feedback, it will help if you feel like you can use the feedback you get effectively.

The following is a slightly edited excerpt from my book Getting the Best of Your Dissertation: Practical Perspectives for Effective Research: [Read more…]

10 Reasons why academics should blog [Infographic]

How can you improve your writing and productivity, collaborate and network more easily, find new and unexpected experiences, disseminate your research more widely, and build your reputation? Start a blog. Academics can realize many benefits from blogging. This infographic shares ten of those benefits: [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: October 2, 2015

Happy October! Are you staying on track with your fallYou might not write will every day, but you can always edit a bad page. You can't edit a blank page. writing projects? Whether you are or you aren’t, Jodi Picoult’s advice—”You might not write well every day, but you can always edit a bad page. You can’t edit a blank page.”seems an appropriate reminder. We may not always write things worth keeping or it may need heavy editing, but at least it is down on paper. Something is there that is workable and moldable. A blank page cannot offer that.

Happy writing! [Read more…]

Peer Review Week [#PeerRevWk15]

This week is the first ever Peer Review Week. Peer Review Week 2015ORCID, ScienceOpen, Sense About Science, and Wiley launched this idea and will be sharing various posts, webinars, and other activities throughout the week. Many more organizations and scholars are expected (and already are) tweeting and blogging about peer review. You can follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag: #PeerRevWk15.

To join in on Peer Review Week, we’re highlighting some of our past articles on peer review: [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: September 11, 2015

I’d love to write a light-hearted opening paragraph, American flagbut my mind is too consumed by the thought of what today represents. Instead, all I’ll say is, take a moment to remember and reflect on the events of this day in 2001—the horror we felt and how we came together as a nation. I encourage you to take a moment of silence in honor of all who lost their lives, lost a loved one, or were otherwise impacted by the events of this day.

We will never forget. [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: August 14, 2015

This week is another one jam-packed with Neil Gaiman writing quote.excellent articles. From academics lonely at work, to being a good reviewer, to e-reader screen size, you are sure to find at least one article that is useful to you or sparks your interest. Did you read an outstanding article on textbooks, textbook writing, or academic writing? If so, I encourage you to share the knowledge by sharing it in the comments below!

And, as always, happy writing! [Read more…]

The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: July 24, 2015

Wouldn’t it be nice if in fact inspiration truth is... inspiration doesn't always just stike when we need itwould strike at just the very moment we need it? Sometimes I like to live in the delusion that it will, but really, it’s often deadlines that spark the most “inspiration.” Maybe you know this feeling too. We can try and force inspiration (like a deadline), but really it is in the moments that we aren’t looking for it that inspiration strikes. Maybe that is the key—to not go looking for it—to let it come on it’s own. Or, if all else fails follow the brilliant advice of Peter De Vries, “I write when I’m inspired, and I see to it that I’m inspired at nine o’clock every morning.

Happy writing! [Read more…]