TAA Professional Directory is growing! New editors, indexers, textbook illustrators & coaches

Find professionals specializing in textbook and academic writing in TAA’s Professional Directory. All offer discounts to TAA members of up to 35 percent!

Professional categories include: Academic Writing & Productivity Coaches, Accountants & Tax Advisors, Editors, Indexers, Intellectual Property Attorneys, Literary Agents, and Textbook Illustrators.

If you would like to be considered for inclusion in this directory, please complete the Professional Directory Form. Not a TAA member? Join TAA for only $30!

Tax tips for authors: Learn how your agent is reporting your writing income

Robert Pesce

Robert Pesce

Tax Tips for Authors

One of the things that can affect your tax returns is the income that you report from writing in the form of royalties, advances, etc. Many of you will have literary agents and those agents will report to you what you’ve earned at the end of a year on a 1099. While the IRS says that agencies are supposed to report to their clients the gross income amount that was received, most agencies report on the net basis, and the IRS doesn’t seem to be aware of, or care about that. But as an author, you really need to know on what basis your agent is reporting income because it could potentially affect your tax return. [Read more…]

How to negotiate textbook contracts strategically

Many textbook authors, especially new authors, are intimidated high stack of booksby the idea of negotiating their contracts, but strategic and artful contract negotiation is essential to ensure that you get the best offer possible.

“It is very important to negotiate your contract, because the first offer will not be the best deal, so you’ll just be leaving money on the table if you don’t negotiate,” said Stephen Gillen, intellectual property attorney at Wood, Herron & Evans.

Michael Lennie, attorney and literary agent at Lennie Literary Agency, considers the clauses regarding royalties, competing works, and the rights to electronic versions of the work to be among the most important portions of a contract to negotiate. In addition, he suggests that authors try to negotiate the reversion clause, which is a clause that determines a date for when the rights to a book will be reverted to the author in the event that it is never published or goes out of print. [Read more…]

Why you might want to consider hiring a literary agent to help you negotiate your next textbook contract

Michael Lennie

Michael Lennie

Authoring Attorney and Literary Agent Michael Lennie, of Lennie Literary & Author’s Attorneys, answers some questions about the advantages of hiring a literary agent to represent you when negotiating a textbook contract:

Q: How often are you hired as an agent for textbook authors?

Lennie: “A rough estimate would be 5-8 times a year, and the number is slowly growing.” [Read more…]

Textbook author shares her experience working with literary agent

Dr. Cynthia Arem hired literary agent Michael Lennie of Lennie Literary & Authors Attorneys to negotiate the contract for her most recent book, Conquering Writing Anxiety. He is also negotiating the terms for her Conquering Reading Anxiety book, which is in the proposal stage, and negotiating the terms for the third edition of her Conquering Math Anxiety: A Self-Help Workbook with CD, 2nd Edition, published by Brooks/Cole.

“I previously negotiated my own contracts, and in retrospect, realized that I gave too many of my rights away, and I was missing important clauses in the contracts; clauses which would have been to my benefit,” she said. “I find that my agent fights for me. I don’t have to deal with contract negotiations with my publisher. My agent knows contract law and works to get me the best contract terms an author can get.” [Read more…]

Textbooks-to-trade shift not always easy

The trade book market can be lucrative, so it’s no wonder some indexingtextbook authors have their hands dipped into both pots. But how can a textbook author “cross over” to trade? Most literary agents agree that being academically published gives trade book-author wannabes extra credibility, but the question is, does the textbook author have what it takes to write for the trade book market. [Read more…]