The most useful textbook & academic writing posts of the week: May 28, 2015

“The scariest moment is always just before you start.” –Stephen King "The scariest moment is always just before you start." Stephen King quote

I cannot say with certainty that, “the scariest moment is always just before you start.” I have to think that I am not alone in thinking the scariest moment is right before submitting the final draft. As a perfectionist I always strive to get it perfect, yet in writing (and most everything in life), I know that it will always have errors. An extra comma or two are almost always inevitable. If you too face the internal struggles of perfectionism and knowing that it will never be perfect, than you will appreciate a few of this week’s articles below. Maybe you are more of the 95-percenter (see The Thesis Whisper’s The last 5%) and the perfectionism struggle does not apply. Fortunately for you there are many other great articles this week that are well worth the read. 😉

Happy reading and, as always, happy writing! [Read more…]

3 Most popular TAA Blog posts

The three biggest mistakes academic writers makeMost Popular Posts
has been viewed 11,133 times.

How to write a sophisticated, dynamic scholarly argument
has been viewed 6,546 times.

How to identify yourself as an academic writer
has been viewed 5,580 times.

Why haven’t you viewed them?

Register for TAA’s September Dissertators United Chapter Virtual Writing Boot Camp

bootcampGain access to resources, accountability check-ins, and support and encouragement as you work to complete your dissertation by joining us for TAA’s September Virtual Dissertation Writing Boot Camp. This second boot camp in a series of 9, will be held September 20-21. It will feature a 30-minute webinar presented by Margarita Huerta, Assistant Professor of English Language Learning/Early Childhood Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, entitled, “Writing With POWER”. [Read more…]

TAA Upcoming Fall Webinars for Textbook & Academic Authors

Join us for these 60-minute live, interactive sessions that connect you to experts discussing a variety of topics designed especially for textbook and academic authors. Free for members! Join TAA today for only $30.

Nathaniel LambertPublish & Prosper: Strategies for Becoming a More Productive Scholar

Podcast now available in TAA’s Podcast Library

Intended to help you succeed in academia by increasing your scholarly productivity, this webinar provides strategies for getting articles published quickly in reputable research journals. Rather than focusing on the basics of writing about results, this unique webinar, presented by Nathaniel Mark Lambert, Ph.D., author of Publish and Prosper: A Strategy Guide for Students and Researchers provides tips on how to approach research, maintain motivation, maximize productivity, and overcome common pitfalls so as to become a productive scholar. Register [Read more…]

TAA launches new website and online member community

TAA website

TAA announces the launch of its new website, featuring an updated look and improved navigation, making it easier to locate resources quickly and easily.

The new website, still available at www.TAAonline.net, introduces some exciting new features:

  • A searchable Member Directory that will allow members to connect with other members based on interests, publisher, location, and more.
  • An online member community where members can exchange ideas, ask questions and share their expertise. [Read more…]

WEBINAR: Confronting the Anxiety of Academic Writing

Becoming an effective academic writer is one of the key challenges facing doctoral students and early career researchers. Despite the centrality of writing, few writers feel comfortable with the process or confident about their product.  Rachael Cayley, author of the blog, Explorations of Style, discusses the anxiety that attends academic writing.

Rachael Cayley is a Senior Lecturer at the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto. She teaches academic writing and speaking to graduate students. Before joining the University of Toronto, she worked as an editor at Oxford University Press in Toronto. She has a PhD in philosophy from the New School for Social Research and a BA in political science from the University of British Columbia. Rachael blogs at Explorations of Style and tweets at @explorstyle. 

Promoting outstanding writing: An interview with Patricia Goodson, Ph.D.

Patricia Goodson

Patricia Goodson

Becoming An Academic WriterPatricia Goodson is Professor of Health Education at Texas A&M University, and Director of the College of Education and Human Development’s Writing Initiative (P.O.W.E.R. Services), a college-wide writing support service for graduate students. P.O.W.E.R. is grounded in the model described in her book, Becoming an Academic Writer.

Here Goodson talks to TAA about her approach to writing and about managing a successful writing support service for graduate students. [Read more…]

How to use social media as an academic writer

Social mediaSocial media has become an influential force in both our personal and professional lives. According to Mark Carrigan, social media trainer and sociologist at the University of Warwick, social media offers many benefits for academic writers. In a recent TAA webinar entitled, ‘What On Earth Will I Tweet About?’: Feeling Comfortable with Social Media as an Academic, Carrigan shared some of those benefits.

“One advantage of social media for academic writers is that it allows you to have an independent presence online so if you switch institutions, you can still easily be found,” Carrigan said. Since many academics work at multiple educational institutions during their careers, an independent online presence can be an invaluable networking and promotional tool.

Social media platforms can offer many advantages in both the pre- and post-publication stages of textbooks and journal articles. [Read more…]

How to turn a seminar paper into a publication

Richard Hull

Richard Hull

The Director of Graduate Studies for your department has made noises about “the professional turn,” namely, writing for publication and not merely to demonstrate to the professor what you know. While you had a vague idea of what was meant, this is the first indication you have that you may be in the turn. What do you do now?

Your first stop is a meeting with your professor. Ask where it is likely to be publishable. And ask what else needs to be done to the paper to make it able to pass review. [Read more…]