4 ways to use your academic writing for social good

Academic Writing for Social GoodIn their TAA webinar, “Academic Writing for Social Good”, Janet Salmons, Methods Guru for SAGE Methodspace and an independent researcher, writer and consultant with Vision2Lead, Inc., and Lynn Wilson, contributing faculty in the PhD in Walden University Public Policy and Administration Program, shared insight into how academic writing can be used to influence the greater social good.

Salmons and Wilson define social good as “writing that supports change to improve well-being of people in our communities or around the world”, and shared how research and academic writing can be used to inform, organize, advocate, and propose solutions contributing to social good. [Read more…]

2/9 TAA Webinar: ‘Fair Use or Infringement in 2018, and Other Current Copyright Issues’

Kenneth Norwick The Legal Guide for Writers Artists and Other Creative PeopleWhen is your (unauthorized) use of copyrighted content “fair use” and when is it copyright infringement? Join us Friday, February 9 from 2-3 p.m. ET for the TAA webinar, “Fair Use or Infringement in 2018, and Other Current Copyright Issues”, presented by Kenneth Norwick, a lawyer and author of The Legal Guide for Writers, Artists and Other Creative People.

Norwick will discuss several important pending cases, including the case challenging the practice of public universities in Georgia of including without license excerpts from textbooks in student course-packs and the case in the District of Columbia asking whether privately-created standards and procedures that are incorporated into government regulations can be owned by the private creators or become “public domain” when they effectively become “law.” He will also discuss the arguments on both sides of these cases and the reasoning of the previous court decisions in them and offer some suggestions that authors can follow when deciding whether and how to use the copyrighted works of others. [Read more…]

Copyright Office introduces online group registration of photographs

copyrightThe U.S. Copyright Office announced that it will begin accepting applications for group registration of photographs through the Office’s online registration system starting February 20, 2018. In most cases, applicants will generally be required to file such applications online, and may include up to 750 photographs in each claim.

The Office has also made other changes to streamline the practices relating to group registration of photographs, described in a final rule published in the Federal Register today. [Read more…]

Learning from teaching in the anxiety zone

AnxietyI knew I had to do it. For too long I’d sat planted in front of my computer and wallowed in my old-quilt routine: writing, eating, tv-ing, sleeping, client manuscripts, gym, occasional grocery stocking, writing, eating, clients, tv-ing, sleeping. But I couldn’t deny that edge of vague dissatisfaction.

What do the gurus say? Stretch yourself, challenge yourself, get out of your comfort cocoon. It was time to get out and teach a writing workshop. [Read more…]

TAA members share their mentoring experiences and advice

MentoringWhat is a mentor? Merriam-Webster defines a mentor as “a trusted counselor or guide”. As writers, much of our efforts are completed individually, and even when contributing to a larger body of work, the relationships are more often collaborative in nature than one of a mentoring type, but few successful authors have reached that level of success without the guidance of one or more who came before them and guided their efforts. Several TAA members share their experiences as either a mentor or mentee and some advice for successful mentoring relationships. [Read more…]

Academic writing: Counting words of meaning?

Academic WriterOur priorities are reflected in our sense of professional identity. Are you an academic or a writer? Are you an instructor/researcher/research supervisor/committee member/conference presentation planner (not to mention parent, community volunteer and…) who is compelled to write in order to get, keep, or advance in a desired career? Do you see yourself as a writer who uses what you learn from your life and work to inspire others? Or are you looking for the right balance? [Read more…]

How to balance the demands of teaching and working on your thesis

Work Life BalanceIf you asked most people about the demands of a teaching position, they’d quickly agree that time extends beyond the classroom hours with grading and student interaction turning most part-time roles into full-time commitments of time and full-time roles into, well, more. Ask the same about the time involved in getting a graduate degree, especially during the research-intensive processes of a thesis or dissertation, and in most cases, you’ll hear of it being a full-time job unto itself.

So how can one person balance the demands of these two time-intensive efforts? For the answer, we sought the opinions of several TAA members, and as a bonus have included some additional resources to assist you if you are currently in or considering such a balancing act yourself. [Read more…]

Schedule time to market your work or pay the consequences

MarketingCommitting to writing involves more than just working away at a new Word file. It also requires the commitment to promote and market the eventual work as well. This does not come naturally to everyone, but this dedication to help spread the word about the work is equally important as the content itself.

Whether it is a journal article, a monograph, a textbook, or some other form of academic communication, marketing is essential to the success of the material. [Read more…]

5 Questions to ask your publisher about their author websites

Katie LinderIn today’s marketplace, authors need to be integrally involved with the marketing of their books, including making decisions about author websites. While many authors have the opportunity to use their publisher’s author website option, they should carefully consider whether that website offers the design elements, content features, and editing flexibility to best serve their needs.

If you are trying to decide whether to go with your publisher’s website or to create and maintain one on your own, Katie Linder, director of the Ecampus Research Unit at Oregon State University and creator of “The Academic Book Promotion Toolkit”online course, provides the following five questions to ask your publisher to make sure you have a clear understanding of what is possible with their website. [Read more…]

Students lead the march toward mobile: Three strategies for adapting and responding

Mobile textbookIt is becoming increasingly clear that students want and need to use mobile devices as a supplement to their print and e-textbooks and LMS course platforms. In fact, many students prefer reading on mobile. Students are leading the market to mobile, and publishers are following. Some authors are working to adapt existing materials to the mobile platform, but in many cases the publisher adapts the material with little or no author input. Authors have a vested interest in keeping up with this transition in terms of the technology opportunities, content quality control, and enhanced marketability of their works. [Read more…]